citriculture


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Related to citriculture: coculture, floriculture

cit·ri·cul·ture

 (sĭt′rĭ-kŭl′chər)
n.
The cultivation of citrus fruits.


cit′ri·cul′tur·ist n.

citriculture

(ˈsɪtrɪˌkʌltʃə)
n
(Agriculture) the cultivation of citrus fruits
ˌcitriˈculturist n

cit•ri•cul•ture

(ˈsɪ trɪˌkʌl tʃər)

n.
the cultivation of citrus fruits.
[1915–20]
cit`ri•cul′tur•ist, n.

citriculture

the cultivation of citrus fruits, as lemons, oranges, etc. — citriculturist, n.
See also: Plants
the cultivation of citrus fruits, as lemons, oranges, etc. — citriculturist, n.
See also: Agriculture
the cultivation of citrus fruits, as lemons, oranges, etc. — citriculturist, n.
See also: Trees
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References in periodicals archive ?
Citrus black spot (CBS), caused by Guignardia citricarpa (=Phyllosticta citricarpa), is one of the main fungal diseases in citriculture.
In: Rehabilitation of citrus industry in the Asia Pacific region: proceedings of the 4th Asia Pacific International Conference on Citriculture, Chiang Mai, Thailand.
66) With the "General Guidelines," the planners unleashed the engineering and technological forces that could transform the landscape of Sochi, calling for the improvement of the land by straightening the Matsesta and Sochi rivers, draining swamps in the Matsesta river valley, rebuilding the Sukhumi--Novorossiisk Highway and introducing a continuous park alongside it as well as a paved walking path (terrenkur) designed by the best landscape architects and architects of the USSR, creating numerous new city parks, and introducing citriculture to the region.
In Yucatan, Mexico, beekeeping and citriculture (mainly represented by C.
Thus the objective of the present study was to carry out a survey on a larger scale, as a subsidy to encouraging the application of minimal processing to this horticultural product, since it is of great economic and food importance, thus producing an alternative outlet for citriculture produce.
What is most meaningful for those with an interest in citriculture, southern California, labor, boosterism, and nascent metropolitan growth is the social history that Hall provides, which is also conscious of top-down forces such as transportation, technology, and architecture.