civic


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Related to civic: Honda, Civic education

civ·ic

 (sĭv′ĭk)
adj.
Of, relating to, or belonging to a city, a citizen, or citizenship; municipal or civil.

[Latin cīvicus, from cīvis, citizen; see kei- in Indo-European roots.]

civ′i·cal·ly adv.

civic

(ˈsɪvɪk)
adj
1. (Human Geography) of or relating to a city, citizens, or citizenship: civic duties.
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) of or relating to a city, citizens, or citizenship: civic duties.
[C16: from Latin cīvicus, from cīvis citizen]
ˈcivically adv

civ•ic

(ˈsɪv ɪk)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to a city; municipal.
2. of or pertaining to citizenship; civil.
3. of citizens: civic pride.
[1535–45; < Latin cīvicus=cīv(is) citizen + -icus -ic]
civ′i•cal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.civic - of or relating or belonging to a city; "civic center"; "civic problems"
2.civic - of or relating to or befitting citizens as individuals; "civil rights"; "civil liberty"; "civic duties"; "civic pride"

civic

adjective public, community, borough, municipal, communal, local the businessmen and civic leaders of Manchester

civic

adjective
Of, concerning, or affecting the community or the people:
Translations
مَدَني، مَديني
městskýobčanský
by-officiel
borgaralegur
miestiečiųmiestopiliečiųpilietinis
pilsētas-pilsoņu-
občiansky
kentselşehre ait

civic

[ˈsɪvɪk]
A. ADJ [rights, duty] → cívico; [authorities] → municipal
B. CPD civic centre N (Brit) → conjunto m de edificios municipales
see also pride A1

civic

[ˈsɪvɪk] adj
[responsibility] → civique; [pride] → civique
[group] → municipal(e)
civic leader → notable mcivic centre n (British)salle f municipale (pour la vie administrative et culturelle de la commune)

civic

adj rights, virtuesbürgerlich, Bürger-; duties, responsibilitiesals Bürger; guard, authoritiesStadt-, städtisch; event, receptionder Stadt

civic

[ˈsɪvɪk] adjcivico/a

civic

(ˈsivik) adjective
of or belonging to a city or citizen. Our offices are in the new civic centre; civic duties.
References in classic literature ?
The civic improvements so enthusiastically contemplated by the five millionaires in the earlier pages of this veracious chronicle--the fountain, reservoir, town-hall, and free library--had not yet been erected.
A philanthropist and friend of labor bishop--a Civic Federation decoy duck for the chloroforming of the wage-working- man
The sheriffs with their great chains and nosegays, other civic gewgaws and monsters, criers, ushers, a great gallery full of people - a large theatrical audience - looked on, as the two-and-thirty and the Judge were solemnly confronted.
These are absolutely destitute of civic rights; and a great number of them, not having even intelligence enough for the purposes of warfare, are devoted by the States to the service of education.
In the case of oratory, this is the function of the Political art and of the art of rhetoric: and so indeed the older poets make their characters speak the language of civic life; the poets of our time, the language of the rhetoricians.
If his civic and family life have to do with literature, everything will be printed and read and laughed over and discussed; until at length, he hardly dare show his face in the street at all, seeing that he will have been described by report as recognisable through his gait alone
Around and behind him were people in plain civic dresses, and two or three war-worn veterans, evidently officers of rank, arrayed in a uniform of blue and buff.
But there is sometimes nothing like the imagination of these people who have none, and Newman, now and then, in an unguided stroll in a foreign city, before some lonely, sad-towered church, or some angular image of one who had rendered civic service in an unknown past, had felt a singular inward tremor.
They drifted along the line of seats made gay with the dresses of the summer boarders, and one of the town officials patrolled and perspired till he shone all over with pure civic pride.
Perhaps that faculty of unawareness was what gave her eyes their transparency, and her face the look of representing a type rather than a person; as if she might have been chosen to pose for a Civic Virtue or a Greek goddess.
After leaving behind him the civic Tournelle* and the criminal tower, and skirted the great walls of the king's garden, on that unpaved strand where the mud reached to his ankles, he reached the western point of the city, and considered for some time the islet of the Passeur-aux-Vaches, which has disappeared beneath the bronze horse of the Pont Neuf.
Atlanta was literally packed, at the time, with people from all parts of the country, and with representatives of foreign governments, as well as with military and civic organizations.