civil death


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civil death

n.
1. The revocation of civil rights by a government, especially as a consequence of a felony conviction or treasonous act.
2. The loss of civil rights as a consequence of banishment, abjuring the realm, or entry into a religious order.

civil death

n
(Law) law (formerly) the loss of all civil rights because of a serious conviction. See also attainder
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.civil death - the legal status of a person who is alive but who has been deprived of the rights and privileges of a citizen or a member of society; the legal status of one sentenced to life imprisonment
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
legal status - a status defined by law
2.civil death - cancellation of civil rights
cancellation - the act of cancelling; calling off some arrangement
Translations
morte civil
References in classic literature ?
He goes for ten years," replied the guard, "which is the same thing as civil death, and all that need be said is that this good fellow is the famous Gines de Pasamonte, otherwise called Ginesillo de Parapilla.
Civil death is the loss of all or almost all civil rights by a person, caused by the government of a country.
Punishments of this sort are extremely common historically: outlawry, infamy, exile, excommunication, attainder, and civil death form a chain of exclusionary punishments across the centuries.
In one particularly compelling analysis, Gabriel Chin argues that CCs have effectively resurrected the colonial-era punishment of "civil death," and must be understood as punishment, just as civil death was.
penal systems developed in parallel with the plantation, for example, she introduces the figure of the black convict, whose activation by the law as a culpable person is not fully accounted for by the procedures of what Colin Dayan and others have described as the civil death enacted in both prison and plantation.
The owner of the land, if not traced after seven years of 1965 might be considered as embraced civil death following the Rule 108 of the Evidence Act of 1872.
Today, civil death in the US is for the most part lived by felons and convicts--people who, depending on their legal situation, can no longer vote or in other ways participate in civil society.
The separation from service, with the label "immoral man," truly constituted for Barros Basto (as both the officer and the Jew) a civil death penalty, because he was definitively suspended from performing his duties, definitively impeded from pursuing his career, and definitively banned from wearing his uniform, badges, and military insignia; and he was forced to forever remain subject to disciplinary action of the Army (i.
This Article proposes that civil death has surreptitiously
The civil death was abolished (capitis deminutio) also in mid-nineteenth century.
This essay first purports to explain the curious legal and metaphysical status of civil death and how it applies to Mrs.