civil rights

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Related to civil-rights: Civil Rights movement, Civil Rights Act of 1964

civil rights

pl.n.
The rights belonging to an individual by virtue of citizenship, especially the fundamental freedoms and privileges guaranteed by the 13th and 14th Amendments to the US Constitution and by subsequent acts of Congress, including civil liberties, due process, equal protection of the laws, and freedom from discrimination.
adj. or civ·il-rights (sĭv′əl-rīts′)
1. Of or relating to such rights or privileges: civil rights legislation.
2. Of or relating to a political movement, especially during the 1950s and 1960s, devoted to securing equal opportunity and treatment for members of minority groups.

civil rights

pl n
1. (Law) the personal rights of the individual citizen, in most countries upheld by law, as in the US
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (modifier) of, relating to, or promoting equality in social, economic, and political rights

civ′il rights′


n.pl.
(often caps.)
rights to personal liberty, esp. as established by the 13th and 14th Amendments to the U.S. Constitution and certain Congressional acts.
[1715–25]
civ′il-rights′, adj.
Translations
občanská práva
borgerrettigheder
kansalaisoikeudet
građanska prava
公民権
시민권
medborgerliga rättigheter
สิทธิที่เท่ากันของพลเมือง
quyền công dân

civil rights

npldiritti mpl civili

civil rights

حُقُوق مَدَنِيِّة občanská práva borgerrettigheder Bürgerrechte πολιτικά δικαιώματα derechos civiles kansalaisoikeudet droits civiques građanska prava diritti civili 公民権 시민권 burgerrechten borgerrettigheter prawa obywatelskie direitos cívicos, direitos civis гражданские права medborgerliga rättigheter สิทธิที่เท่ากันของพลเมือง vatandaşlık hakları quyền công dân 公民权利
References in periodicals archive ?
LAST spring, immigration-rights supporters loudly demanded that civil-rights groups take part in immigration-rights marches and endorse immigration-reform bills in Congress.
So were poets, civil-rights leaders, and a former head of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI).
So began the confused, quixotic campaign that would consume much of the last two years of the civil-rights leader's life, an extended moment when King stopped looking like a heaven-sent prophet to many Americans and started looking like just another mixed-up liberal.
Similarly, in some circles it has become a popular mantra to attribute the electoral losses of civil-rights era politicians to "our side" forces, rather than to their records.
Almost immediately, a group of Southerners opposed to the party's new civil-rights platform broke away and formed a new party known as the Dixiecrats.
Juan Williams has written an impressive biography entitled Thurgood Marshall: American Revolutionary (Times Books, 1998) about the first black Supreme Court justice and the civil-rights movement he helped shape.
When a law student at Georgetown had the audacity to publish statistics showing that black law-school applicants were admitted with lower grades and achievement-test scores than whites, the "whistle-blower" was denounced by black students, and the two distinguished civil-rights lawyers (Tom Mack and Bob Catz, both professors at the D.
Congress long ago determined that attorney's fees in civil-rights and constitutional cases are necessary to help prevailing parties vindicate their civil rights and to enable vigorous enforcement of these protections.
It is his voice that narrates the 1987 public-television series on the civil-rights movement, Eyes on the Prize.
The classic civil-rights approach adopted by blacks seems to predominate for now.
They then promptly wrap themselves in the martyr's cloak of persecuted civil-rights fighters.
Bush's visit to Bob Jones University and his Disney-like deployments of black faces during the 2000 Republican national convention, and through Al Gore's tub-thumping, slightly surreal civil-rights oration at the Ebeneezer Baptist Church.

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