civilisation


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Related to civilisation: Chinese civilisation
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.civilisation - the social process whereby societies achieve an advanced stage of development and organizationcivilisation - the social process whereby societies achieve an advanced stage of development and organization
social process - a process involved in the formation of groups of persons
2.civilisation - a particular society at a particular time and placecivilisation - a particular society at a particular time and place; "early Mayan civilization"
archaeology, archeology - the branch of anthropology that studies prehistoric people and their cultures
society - an extended social group having a distinctive cultural and economic organization
subculture - a social group within a national culture that has distinctive patterns of behavior and beliefs
Aegean civilisation, Aegean civilization, Aegean culture - the prehistoric civilization on the islands in the Aegean sea and the surrounding countries; "by 800 BC the entire Aegean had adopted this style of pottery"
Helladic civilisation, Helladic civilization, Helladic culture - the bronze-age culture of mainland Greece that flourished 2500-1100 BC
Indus civilization - the bronze-age culture of the Indus valley that flourished from about 2600-1750 BC
Minoan civilisation, Minoan civilization, Minoan culture - the bronze-age culture of Crete that flourished 3000-1100 BC
Mycenaean civilisation, Mycenaean civilization, Mycenaean culture - the late bronze-age culture of Mycenae that flourished 1400-1100 BC
Paleo-American culture, Paleo-Amerind culture, Paleo-Indian culture - the prehistoric culture of the earliest human inhabitants of North America and South America
Western civilization, Western culture - the modern culture of western Europe and North America; "when Ghandi was asked what he thought of Western civilization he said he thought it would be a good idea"
3.civilisation - a society in an advanced state of social development (e.g., with complex legal and political and religious organizations)civilisation - a society in an advanced state of social development (e.g., with complex legal and political and religious organizations); "the people slowly progressed from barbarism to civilization"
political science, politics, government - the study of government of states and other political units
society - an extended social group having a distinctive cultural and economic organization
Islam, Muslimism - the civilization of Muslims collectively which is governed by the Muslim religion; "Islam is predominant in northern Africa, the Middle East, Pakistan, and Indonesia"
4.civilisation - the quality of excellence in thought and manners and taste; "a man of intellectual refinement"; "he is remembered for his generosity and civilization"
excellence - the quality of excelling; possessing good qualities in high degree
Translations
تَمْدين، تَحَضُّر، تمدُّنمَدَنِيَّه، حَضارَه
siîmenningsiîmenntuî òjóî

civilize,

civilise

(ˈsivilaiz) verb
to change the ways of (a primitive people) to those found in a more advanced type of society. The Romans tried to civilize the ancient Britons.
ˌciviliˈzation, ˌciviliˈsation noun
1. the act of civilizing, or process or state of being civilized.
2. a civilized people and their way of life. the ancient civilizations of Egypt and Greece.
References in classic literature ?
All was wild and solitary, and one might have declared it a scene untrodden by the foot of man, but for the telegraph posts and small piles of broken "macadam" at punctual intervals, and the ginger-beer bottles and paper bags of local confectioners that lent an air of civilisation to the road.
All those minute circumstances belonging to private life and domestic character, all that gives verisimilitude to a narrative, and individuality to the persons introduced, is still known and remembered in Scotland; whereas in England, civilisation has been so long complete, that our ideas of our ancestors are only to be gleaned from musty records and chronicles, the authors of which seem perversely to have conspired to suppress in their narratives all interesting details, in order to find room for flowers of monkish eloquence, or trite reflections upon morals.
It compels all nations, on pain of extinction, to adopt the bourgeois mode of production; it compels them to introduce what it calls civilisation into their midst, i.
Thus was celebrated the inauguration of this great railroad, a mighty instrument of progress and civilisation, thrown across the desert, and destined to link together cities and towns which do not yet exist.
Why am I here now, an outcast from civilisation, instead of being a happy man enjoying all the pleasures of London?
For my own part, I was much occupied in learning to ride the bicycle, and busy upon a series of papers discussing the probable developments of moral ideas as civilisation progressed.
To the Chinese such commonplace things as marriage, friendship, and home have an infinitely deeper meaning than can be attached to them by civilisation which practically lives abroad, in the hotels and restaurants and open houses of others, where there is no sanctity of the life within, no shrine set apart for the hidden family re-union, and the cult of the ancestral spirit.
I ask you, gentlemen, listen sometimes to the moans of an educated man of the nineteenth century suffering from toothache, on the second or third day of the attack, when he is beginning to moan, not as he moaned on the first day, that is, not simply because he has toothache, not just as any coarse peasant, but as a man affected by progress and European civilisation, a man who is "divorced from the soil and the national elements," as they express it now-a-days.
These are the poor, and amongst them there is no grace of manner, or charm of speech, or civilisation, or culture, or refinement in pleasures, or joy of life.
As far as civilisation goes they are in their second.
She differs somewhat from the young man I just mentioned, in that the faculty of production, of action, is, in her, less inanimate; she has more of the freshness and vigour that we suppose to belong to a young civilisation.
In him were traces of the softening civilisation of ages--of some of the higher instincts and education of man, no matter how rudimentary these might be.