clam


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Related to clam: clam up

clam 1

 (klăm)
n.
1.
a. Any of various usually burrowing marine and freshwater bivalve mollusks chiefly of the subclass Heterodonta, including members of the families Veneridae and Myidae, many of which are edible.
b. The soft edible body of such a mollusk.
2. Informal A close-mouthed person, especially one who can keep a secret.
3. Slang A dollar: owed them 75 clams.
intr.v. clammed, clam·ming, clams
To hunt for clams.
Phrasal Verb:
clam up Informal
To refuse to talk.

[From obsolete clam-shell, shell that clamps, clam, from clam.]

clam′mer n.

clam 2

 (klăm)
n.
A clamp or vise.

[Middle English, from Old English clam, clamm, bond, fetter.]

clam

(klæm)
n
1. (Animals) any of various burrowing bivalve molluscs of the genera Mya, Venus, etc. Many species, such as the quahog and soft-shell clam, are edible and Tridacna gigas is the largest known bivalve, nearly 1.5 metres long
2. (Cookery) the edible flesh of such a mollusc
3. informal a reticent person
vb, clams, clamming or clammed
(intr) chiefly US to gather clams
[C16: from earlier clamshell, that is, shell that clamps; related to Old English clamm fetter, Old High German klamma constriction; see clamp1]

clam

(klæm)
vb, clams, clamming or clammed
a variant of clem

clam

(klæm)

n., v. clammed, clam•ming. n.
1. any of various usu. edible bivalve mollusks with equal shells closed by two adductor muscles, inhabiting shallow seas or fresh waters. Compare quahog.
2. Informal. a secretive or silent person.
3. Slang. a dollar or the sum of a dollar.
v.i.
4. to gather or dig clams.
5. clam up, Informal. to refuse to talk or reply: so shy that he clams up in public.
[1585–95; short for clamshell, with clam clamp (now dial.; Middle English; Old English: bond, fetter, c. Old High German chlamma)]
clam′like`, adj.
clam′mer, n.

clam

(klăm)
Any of various bivalve mollusks having equal shells and a burrowing foot, some of which are edible. Clams include both marine and freshwater species.

Clam

 a stack or pile of bricks; a heap of oysters.
Examples: clam of bricks, 1663; of earth, 1554; of oysters.

clam


Past participle: clammed
Gerund: clamming

Imperative
clam
clam
Present
I clam
you clam
he/she/it clams
we clam
you clam
they clam
Preterite
I clammed
you clammed
he/she/it clammed
we clammed
you clammed
they clammed
Present Continuous
I am clamming
you are clamming
he/she/it is clamming
we are clamming
you are clamming
they are clamming
Present Perfect
I have clammed
you have clammed
he/she/it has clammed
we have clammed
you have clammed
they have clammed
Past Continuous
I was clamming
you were clamming
he/she/it was clamming
we were clamming
you were clamming
they were clamming
Past Perfect
I had clammed
you had clammed
he/she/it had clammed
we had clammed
you had clammed
they had clammed
Future
I will clam
you will clam
he/she/it will clam
we will clam
you will clam
they will clam
Future Perfect
I will have clammed
you will have clammed
he/she/it will have clammed
we will have clammed
you will have clammed
they will have clammed
Future Continuous
I will be clamming
you will be clamming
he/she/it will be clamming
we will be clamming
you will be clamming
they will be clamming
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been clamming
you have been clamming
he/she/it has been clamming
we have been clamming
you have been clamming
they have been clamming
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been clamming
you will have been clamming
he/she/it will have been clamming
we will have been clamming
you will have been clamming
they will have been clamming
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been clamming
you had been clamming
he/she/it had been clamming
we had been clamming
you had been clamming
they had been clamming
Conditional
I would clam
you would clam
he/she/it would clam
we would clam
you would clam
they would clam
Past Conditional
I would have clammed
you would have clammed
he/she/it would have clammed
we would have clammed
you would have clammed
they would have clammed

clam


Past participle: clammed
Gerund: clamming

Imperative
clam
clam
Present
I clam
you clam
he/she/it clams
we clam
you clam
they clam
Preterite
I clammed
you clammed
he/she/it clammed
we clammed
you clammed
they clammed
Present Continuous
I am clamming
you are clamming
he/she/it is clamming
we are clamming
you are clamming
they are clamming
Present Perfect
I have clammed
you have clammed
he/she/it has clammed
we have clammed
you have clammed
they have clammed
Past Continuous
I was clamming
you were clamming
he/she/it was clamming
we were clamming
you were clamming
they were clamming
Past Perfect
I had clammed
you had clammed
he/she/it had clammed
we had clammed
you had clammed
they had clammed
Future
I will clam
you will clam
he/she/it will clam
we will clam
you will clam
they will clam
Future Perfect
I will have clammed
you will have clammed
he/she/it will have clammed
we will have clammed
you will have clammed
they will have clammed
Future Continuous
I will be clamming
you will be clamming
he/she/it will be clamming
we will be clamming
you will be clamming
they will be clamming
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been clamming
you have been clamming
he/she/it has been clamming
we have been clamming
you have been clamming
they have been clamming
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been clamming
you will have been clamming
he/she/it will have been clamming
we will have been clamming
you will have been clamming
they will have been clamming
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been clamming
you had been clamming
he/she/it had been clamming
we had been clamming
you had been clamming
they had been clamming
Conditional
I would clam
you would clam
he/she/it would clam
we would clam
you would clam
they would clam
Past Conditional
I would have clammed
you would have clammed
he/she/it would have clammed
we would have clammed
you would have clammed
they would have clammed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.clam - burrowing marine mollusk living on sand or mudclam - burrowing marine mollusk living on sand or mud; the shell closes with viselike firmness
bivalve, lamellibranch, pelecypod - marine or freshwater mollusks having a soft body with platelike gills enclosed within two shells hinged together
Mya arenaria, soft-shell clam, long-neck clam, steamer clam, steamer - an edible clam with thin oval-shaped shell found in coastal regions of the United States and Europe
Mercenaria mercenaria, hard clam, Venus mercenaria, hard-shell clam, quahaug, quahog, round clam - an edible American clam; the heavy shells were used as money by some American Indians
geoduck - a large edible clam found burrowing deeply in sandy mud along the Pacific coast of North America; weighs up to six pounds; has siphons that can extend to several feet and cannot be withdrawn into the shell
jackknife clam, knife-handle, razor clam - marine clam having a long narrow curved thin shell
giant clam, Tridacna gigas - a large clam inhabiting reefs in the southern Pacific and weighing up to 500 pounds
shipworm, teredinid - wormlike marine bivalve that bores into wooden piers and ships by means of drill-like shells
clam - flesh of either hard-shell or soft-shell clams
2.clam - a piece of paper money worth one dollarclam - a piece of paper money worth one dollar
U.S.A., United States, United States of America, US, USA, America, the States, U.S. - North American republic containing 50 states - 48 conterminous states in North America plus Alaska in northwest North America and the Hawaiian Islands in the Pacific Ocean; achieved independence in 1776
bank bill, bank note, banker's bill, banknote, Federal Reserve note, government note, greenback, bill, note - a piece of paper money (especially one issued by a central bank); "he peeled off five one-thousand-zloty notes"
3.clam - flesh of either hard-shell or soft-shell clams
clam - burrowing marine mollusk living on sand or mud; the shell closes with viselike firmness
shellfish - meat of edible aquatic invertebrate with a shell (especially a mollusk or crustacean)
hard-shell clam, quahaug, quahog, round clam - Atlantic coast round clams with hard shells; large clams usually used for chowders or other clam dishes
long-neck clam, soft-shell clam, steamer, steamer clam - a clam that is usually steamed in the shell
Verb1.clam - gather clams, by digging in the sand by the ocean
gather, pull together, collect, garner - assemble or get together; "gather some stones"; "pull your thoughts together"
Translations
بطلينوس: سَمَكٌ صَدَفي
mlžškeble
musling
kagyló
skelfiskur
moliuskas
ēdamais gliemezis
lastúrnik

clam

[klæm]
A. N
1. (Zool) → almeja f
2. (US) (= dollar) → dólar m
B. CPD clam chowder N (US) → sopa f de almejas
clam up VI + ADVcerrar el pico, no decir ni pío

clam

[ˈklæm] n (= shellfish) → palourde f
clam up
vila boucler

clam

nVenusmuschel f; he shut up like a clamaus ihm war kein Wort mehr herauszubekommen

clam

[klæm] nvongola
clam up vi + adv (fam) → zittirsi

clam

(klӕm) noun
a shellfish with two shells joined together, used as food.

clam

n. almeja.
References in classic literature ?
I considered the matter a moment, and then up stairs we went, and I was ushered into a small room, cold as a clam, and furnished, sure enough, with a prodigious bed, almost big enough indeed for any four harpooneers to sleep abreast.
Then why don't you make your fortune by hiring yourself out to a museum as the biggest human clam in captivity?
Nay, I spied nothing," grumbled Sir Oliver, "for I was hurried down with a clam stuck in my gizzard and an untasted goblet of Cyprus on the board behind me.
Clam was a dare-devil, but Nelson was a reckless maniac.
my lads, do spring --slap-jacks and quohogs for supper, you know, my lads --baked clams and muffins --oh, do, do spring --he's a hundred barreler --don't lose him now --don't oh, don't
And yet, by ingenious contrivance, this gilded minority, in- stead of being in the tail of the procession where it be- longed, was marching head up and banners flying, at the other end of it; had elected itself to be the Nation, and these innumerable clams had permitted it so long that they had come at last to accept it as a truth; and not only that, but to believe it right and as it should be.
He knew that Sea Vitch never caught a fish in his life but always rooted for clams and seaweed; though he pretended to be a very terrible person.
There goes a man to the sea-shore, with a spade and a bucket, to dig a mess of clams, which were a principal article of food with the first settlers.
With so agreeable a prospect before him, Ulysses fancied that he could not do better than go straight to the palace gate, and tell the master of it that there was a crew of poor shipwrecked mariners, not far off, who had eaten nothing for a day or two, save a few clams and oysters, and would therefore be thankful for a little food.
One can not buy and pay for two cents' worth of clams without trouble and a quarrel.
There were mussels and abalones and clams and rock-oysters, and great ocean-crabs that were thrown upon the beaches in stormy weather.
There's not one of them who is not degrading, man and woman, all of them animated stomachs guided by the high intellectual and artistic impulses of clams - "