clamour


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal.

clam·our

 (klăm′ər)
n. & v. Chiefly British
Variant of clamor.

clamour

(ˈklæmə) or

clamor

n
1. a loud persistent outcry, as from a large number of people
2. a vehement expression of collective feeling or outrage: a clamour against higher prices.
3. a loud and persistent noise: the clamour of traffic.
vb
4. (intr; often foll by for or against) to make a loud noise or outcry; make a public demand: they clamoured for attention.
5. (tr) to move, influence, or force by outcry: the people clamoured him out of office.
[C14: from Old French clamour, from Latin clāmor, from clāmāre to cry out]
ˈclamourer, ˈclamorer n
ˈclamorous adj
ˈclamorously adv
ˈclamorousness n

Clamour

 a company of rooks; a flock of birds; a loud collective noise of musical instruments, 1592; a loud noise of birds and animals; loud shouting; a mingling of voices.
Examples: clamour of disapprobation, 1830; common clamour of the Englishman, 1480; of rooks; of storms, 1876.

clamour


Past participle: clamoured
Gerund: clamouring

Imperative
clamour
clamour
Present
I clamour
you clamour
he/she/it clamours
we clamour
you clamour
they clamour
Preterite
I clamoured
you clamoured
he/she/it clamoured
we clamoured
you clamoured
they clamoured
Present Continuous
I am clamouring
you are clamouring
he/she/it is clamouring
we are clamouring
you are clamouring
they are clamouring
Present Perfect
I have clamoured
you have clamoured
he/she/it has clamoured
we have clamoured
you have clamoured
they have clamoured
Past Continuous
I was clamouring
you were clamouring
he/she/it was clamouring
we were clamouring
you were clamouring
they were clamouring
Past Perfect
I had clamoured
you had clamoured
he/she/it had clamoured
we had clamoured
you had clamoured
they had clamoured
Future
I will clamour
you will clamour
he/she/it will clamour
we will clamour
you will clamour
they will clamour
Future Perfect
I will have clamoured
you will have clamoured
he/she/it will have clamoured
we will have clamoured
you will have clamoured
they will have clamoured
Future Continuous
I will be clamouring
you will be clamouring
he/she/it will be clamouring
we will be clamouring
you will be clamouring
they will be clamouring
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been clamouring
you have been clamouring
he/she/it has been clamouring
we have been clamouring
you have been clamouring
they have been clamouring
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been clamouring
you will have been clamouring
he/she/it will have been clamouring
we will have been clamouring
you will have been clamouring
they will have been clamouring
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been clamouring
you had been clamouring
he/she/it had been clamouring
we had been clamouring
you had been clamouring
they had been clamouring
Conditional
I would clamour
you would clamour
he/she/it would clamour
we would clamour
you would clamour
they would clamour
Past Conditional
I would have clamoured
you would have clamoured
he/she/it would have clamoured
we would have clamoured
you would have clamoured
they would have clamoured
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.clamour - loud and persistent outcry from many people; "he ignored the clamor of the crowd"
cry, outcry, shout, vociferation, yell, call - a loud utterance; often in protest or opposition; "the speaker was interrupted by loud cries from the rear of the audience"
Verb1.clamour - utter or proclaim insistently and noisily; "The delegates clamored their disappointment"
give tongue to, utter, express, verbalise, verbalize - articulate; either verbally or with a cry, shout, or noise; "She expressed her anger"; "He uttered a curse"
2.clamour - make loud demands; "he clamored for justice and tolerance"
demand - request urgently and forcefully; "The victim's family is demanding compensation"; "The boss demanded that he be fired immediately"; "She demanded to see the manager"

clamour

verb
1. yell, shout, scream, howl, bawl My two grandsons were clamouring to go swimming.
noun
1. noise, shouting, racket, outcry, din, uproar, agitation, blare, commotion, babel, hubbub, brouhaha, hullabaloo, shout Kathryn's quiet voice stilled the clamour.
Translations
ضَجَّه، صَحَبيَصْخَب
dožadovat sekřikřev
kræve højlydtråbenskrålenskrigen
lármásan követel
hávaîi, háreystiheimta meî háreysti
kelti triukšmą
klaigasskaļi protestēt/pieprasītskaļš proteststrokšņošanatrokšņot
domáhať sa krikom
vaveylâyaygarayaygara/vaveylâ koparmak

clamour

clamor (US) [ˈklæməʳ]
A. Nclamor m
B. VIclamorear, vociferar
to clamour for sthclamar algo, pedir algo a voces

clamour

[ˈklæmər] (British) clamor (US)
n
(= demand) clamour for sth → demande de qch
(= noise) → clameur f
a clamour of voices → des clameurs
vi (= demand) to clamour for sth → réclamer qch

clamour

, (US) clamor
n
(= noise)Lärm m, → Lärmen nt; the clamour of the battlefieldder Kampf- or Schlachtenlärm
(= demand)lautstark erhobene Forderung (for nach); a clamour against somethingein Aufschrei mgegen etw; constant clamour against the ECständiges Geschrei gegen die EG
vi to clamour for somethingnach etw schreien; to clamour against somethingsich gegen etw empören; the paper clamoured against the governmentdie Zeitung wetterte gegen die Regierung; the men were clamouring to go homedie Männer forderten lautstark die Heimkehr

clamour

clamor (Am) [ˈklæməʳ]
1. n (noise) → clamore m; (protest) → protesta
2. vi to clamour for sthchiedere a gran voce qc

clamour

(American) clamor (ˈklӕmə) noun
(a) loud uproar.
verb
(especially of a crowd demanding something) to make such an uproar etc. They're all clamouring to get their money back.
ˈclamorous adjective
References in classic literature ?
Dimmesdale's outcry, and interpreted it, with its multitudinous echoes and reverberations, as the clamour of the fiends and night-hags, with whom she was well known to make excursions in the forest.
Discipline prevailed: in five minutes the confused throng was resolved into order, and comparative silence quelled the Babel clamour of tongues.
All day long Nada crouched in the cave listening to the sounds of war that crept faintly up the mountain side; howling of wolves, shouting of men, and the clamour of iron on iron.
Amazement seis'd The Rebel Thrones, but greater rage to see Thus foil'd thir mightiest, ours joy filld, and shout, Presage of Victorie and fierce desire Of Battel: whereat MICHAEL bid sound Th' Arch-Angel trumpet; through the vast of Heav'n It sounded, and the faithful Armies rung HOSANNA to the Highest: nor stood at gaze The adverse Legions, nor less hideous joyn'd The horrid shock: now storming furie rose, And clamour such as heard in Heav'n till now Was never, Arms on Armour clashing bray'd Horrible discord, and the madding Wheeles Of brazen Chariots rag'd; dire was the noise Of conflict; over head the dismal hiss Of fiery Darts in flaming volies flew, And flying vaulted either Host with fire.
It cost some exercise of the white truncheon, well seconded by the exertions of the domestics, to silence this canine clamour.
Sometimes the ambition of princes, who never think they have land or people enough to govern; sometimes the corruption of ministers, who engage their master in a war, in order to stifle or divert the clamour of the subjects against their evil administration.
So she sat on, with closed eyes, and half believed herself in Wonderland, though she knew she had but to open them again, and all would change to dull reality--the grass would be only rustling in the wind, and the pool rippling to the waving of the reeds--the rattling teacups would change to tinkling sheep- bells, and the Queen's shrill cries to the voice of the shepherd boy--and the sneeze of the baby, the shriek of the Gryphon, and all thy other queer noises, would change (she knew) to the confused clamour of the busy farm-yard--while the lowing of the cattle in the distance would take the place of the Mock Turtle's heavy sobs.
At first the prince took no heed to all this clamour, but continued to press forward on his way.
Our soldiers had recourse to their muskets, and four of them putting the mouths of their pieces to the heads of some of the most obstinate and turbulent, struck them with such a terror, that all the clamour was stilled in an instant; none received any hurt but the Moor who had been the occasion of the tumult.
The clamour had not yet subsided before they heard steps upon the gravel, and a voice of singular nervous irritability cried to them through the door, 'Who are you, and what do you want?
There were penguins, so agile in the water, heavy and awkward as they are on the ground; they were uttering harsh cries, a large assembly, sober in gesture, but extravagant in clamour.
He went to bed a little after midnight, and was awakened from lurid dreams in the small hours of Monday by the sound of door knockers, feet running in the street, distant drumming, and a clamour of bells.