clanship


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clanship

(ˈklænʃɪp)
n
an association of families under the leadership of a chieftain
References in classic literature ?
The spirit of clanship which was, at an early day, introduced into that kingdom, uniting the nobles and their dependants by ties equivalent to those of kindred, rendered the aristocracy a constant overmatch for the power of the monarch, till the incorporation with England subdued its fierce and ungovernable spirit, and reduced it within those rules of subordination which a more rational and more energetic system of civil polity had previously established in the latter kingdom.
Then for clanship, they are as bad as Highlanders; it is amazing the belief they have in one another.
Glegg's experience; nothing of that kind had happened among the Dodsons before; but it was a case in which her hereditary rectitude and personal strength of character found a common channel along with her fundamental ideas of clanship, as they did in her lifelong regard to equity in money matters.
In this branch of the Dodson family aunt Glegg found a stronger nature than her own; a nature in which family feeling had lost the character of clanship by taking on a doubly deep dye of personal pride.
Thus, despite his sense that such acts of payment were embedded in collective relations of clanship and cycles of intergenerational exchange, Speiser ultimately sees the valuables exchanged for women in commodity terms as 'rent' for her sexual, labouring, and maternal services, or more baldly as a 'price', a price which can be used to calculate a woman's value across diverse islands.
Maclnnes, Clanship, Commerce and the House of Stuart, 1603-1788 (East Linton, 1996).
Issa-Salwe, "The Failure of The Daraawiish State, The Clash Between Somali Clanship and State System," (Paper Presented at the 5th International Congress of Somali Studies, December 1993, Thames Valley University, London, UK) http://www.
Large families and clanship have always ensured that anyone down on their luck had a place to stay and a hot meal to eat, especially the elderly.
Accurate maps of tribal, ethnic and clanship boundaries are, of course, helpful.
The same applies to the patriarchal traditions of clanship and lineage that confined women.
Indeed, a dominant approach in the studies of Chinese overseas is to begin with China as the origin, and interpret Chinese overseas communities in terms of the degree to which they adhere to the politics, culture, kinship, or clanship organization of China (see Pan 1998).