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1. Clearness of appearance: the clarity of the mountain air.
2. Clearness of thought or style; lucidity: writes with clarity and perception.

[Middle English clarite, brightness, from Latin clāritās, clearness, from clārus, clear; see clear.]


1. clearness, as of expression
2. clearness, as of water
[C16: from Latin clāritās, from clārus clear]


(ˈklær ɪ ti)

the state or quality of being clear; transparency; lucidity: the clarity of pure water; a difficult idea presented with clarity.
[1300–50; Middle English clar(i)te < Middle French < Latin clāritās; see clear, -ity]


  1. (The scents of the garden descended upon him, their contours) as precise and clear as the colored bands of a rainbow —Patrick Suskind
  2. As sharp as the last daybreak —Joy Williamson

    From a book jacket blurb about Tess Gallagher’s ability to portray aging people’s vision of irremediable loss in novel, The Lovers of Horses.

  3. As unreadable as a piece of modern sculpture —Frank Swinnerton
  4. (The image) blurred … like something familiar seen beneath disturbed though clear water —William Faulkner
  5. (The consonants) blur together like ink on a wet page —Sue Grafton
  6. Clear and diminished like a scene cut in cameo —Edna St. Vincent Millay
  7. Clear as a bell —John Ray’s Proverbs

    One could compile a small book of just “Clear as” similes. The bell comparison along with “Clear as a whistle” and “Clear as crystal” are probably most frequently used and familiar.

  8. [A theory synthesized from suppositions] clear as a case history written in a book —Jean Stafford
  9. Clear as a cloudless hour —Algernon Charles Swinburne
  10. Clear as a cube of solid sunshine —Anon
  11. [Eyes] clear as a fountain —Walter Savage Landor
  12. Clear as a graph —Anon
  13. Clear as a lake —Samuel Taylor Coleridge
  14. Clear as a legal confession of murder —John Cheever
  15. Clear as an oboe solo —Diane Ackerman
  16. Clear as A on the piano in the middle of all the tuning instruments of an orchestra —Sylvia Plath
  17. Clear as a tear —Sylvia Plath
  18. Clear as cold water —Mark Helprin
  19. (The morning was) clear as glass —Mark Helprin
  20. Clear as infant’s eyes —John Keats
  21. (The creek flashed) clear as quartz —Ella Leffland
  22. Clear as righteousness —Algernon Charles Swinburne
  23. Clear as the A, B, C —George Washington
  24. Clear as the day —Miles Coverdale

    “Clear as” comparisons linked with the day, time of day, and the sun at different times of the day include “Clear as noon” (shortened from the once popular “Clear as noon-day”) and “Clear as the sun” (both attributed to Roger North); “Clear as is the summer’s sun” (William Shakespeare); “Clear as the mid-day sunshine” (Nathaniel Hawthorne); “Clear as daylight” (Arnold Bennett).

  25. Clear as the figures at the bottom of a Profit and Loss Statement —Anon
  26. Clear as the lines in a wet leaf —Charles Johnson
  27. Clear as the note of doom —Lord De Tabley
  28. (The men were naked and) clear as the point of a sword in the sun —George Garrett
  29. (The sky is as) clear as the song of a boy —Beryl Markham
  30. Clear as the twanging of a harp —Alfred, Lord Tennyson
  31. Clear as wind —Alfred, Lord Tennyson
  32. Clear, like accusation —Paul Horgan
  33. [Voice in the “silent dead of night “] distinct as a passing footstep’s fall —Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
  34. Distinctly as white lace on velvet —Thomas Hardy
  35. (Shouldn’t the soul of a man be as) limpid and cutting as a diamond —John Cheever
  36. (The air is) lucid and lonely as wind chimes —Sharon Sheehe Stark
  37. (The poet’s work was about as) lucid as a polygraph chart —Joseph Wambaugh
  38. Lucidity is positively flowing over me like the sweet oils of Persia —Lorraine Hansberry
  39. Precise as a portrait photo —Natascha Wodin
  40. To read him (Descartes) was like swimming in a lake so clear that you could see the bottom —W. Somerset Maugham
  41. (Lake) transparent as liquid chrysolite —T. H. White
  42. Transparent as a white cloud in the moonshine —Hans Christian Anderson
  43. Transparent like some holy thing —Thomas Moore
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.clarity - free from obscurity and easy to understand; the comprehensibility of clear expression
comprehensibility, understandability - the quality of comprehensible language or thought
monosemy - having a single meaning (absence of ambiguity) usually of individual words or phrases
focus - maximum clarity or distinctness of an idea; "the controversy brought clearly into focus an important difference of opinion"
clearcutness, preciseness - clarity as a consequence of precision
perspicuity, perspicuousness, plainness - clarity as a consequence of being perspicuous
unambiguity, unequivocalness - clarity achieved by the avoidance of ambiguity
explicitness - clarity as a consequence of being explicit
abstruseness, obscurity, reconditeness, obscureness - the quality of being unclear or abstruse and hard to understand
2.clarity - the quality of clear waterclarity - the quality of clear water; "when she awoke the clarity was back in her eyes"
transparentness, transparence, transparency - the quality of being clear and transparent
semitransparency, translucence, translucency - the quality of allowing light to pass diffusely
visibility - capability of providing a clear unobstructed view; "a windshield with good visibility"
distinctness, sharpness - the quality of being sharp and clear
quality - an essential and distinguishing attribute of something or someone; "the quality of mercy is not strained"--Shakespeare
opaqueness, opacity - the quality of being opaque to a degree; the degree to which something reduces the passage of light


2. transparency, translucency, translucence, clearness, limpidity The first thing to strike me was the incredible clarity of the water.
transparency dullness, murkiness, cloudiness
"Everything that can be said can be said clearly" [Ludwig Wittgenstein Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus]


1. The condition of being clean and free of contaminants:
2. The quality of being clear and easy to perceive or understand:
skÿrleikurskÿrleikur; skÿrleiki


[ˈklærɪtɪ] N
1. [of statement etc] → claridad f
2. [of image, sound] → claridad f, nitidez f
3. [of water, glass] → claridad f, transparencia f; [of air] → pureza f


[ˈklærɪti] nclarté f


nKlarheit f


[ˈklærɪtɪ] nchiarezza


(ˈklӕrəti) noun
1. the state of being clear or easy to see through. water remarkable for its clarity.
2. the state of being easy to see, hear or understand. She spoke with great clarity.


n. claridad.
References in classic literature ?
Higher up, in the utter clarity of the western slope, the evening star hung like a lamp suspended by silver chains--like the lamp engraved upon the title-page of old Latin texts, which is always appearing in new heavens, and waking new desires in men.
The human, as apart from the scientific, side (developed in his own volumes) of his epoch-making discoveries is marked with a simplicity, clarity, and good sense beyond praise.
The evening was unexpectedly fine--only a few thin level bands of clouds at seven or eight thousand feet broke its luminous clarity.
His pulse became quieter, and his brain increased in clarity.
But the black had eyes only for Jerry, staring at him in wondering amaze until he pieced the situation together in his growing clarity of brain and realized that such a small chunky animal had spoiled his game.
Lightly indeed his flesh sat upon his soul, and his soul, in its briefness of clarity, knew by its very clarity that the black of cessation was near.
Certainly there was something hardly human about the colonel's wolfish pursuit of pleasure, and his chronic resolution not to go home till morning had a touch of the hideous clarity of insomnia.
The words had the effect of lending an additional clarity and firmness of outline to the picture of himself which Bill had already drawn in his mind--of a soulless creature sunk in hoggish slumber.
Clarity FSR is a key component of Clarity 6--which Clarity says is the only Web-based, unified and open CPM solution on the market.
Expertly edited by Bob Gilmore Reader in Musicology, Dartington College of Arts, England), "Maximum Clarity And Other Writings On Music" is a collection of writings on music by Professor Ben Johnston who taught theory and composition from 1951 to 1984 at the University of Illinois School of Music at Urbana-Champaign.
Another set of judges, selected for their ability to work with language clarity and coherence assessment (but who were unfamiliar with the physics concepts being tested), rated the level of clarity of language usage in the explanations.
Tommy Hilliger has also taken a thumping in the clarity department.