classical swine fever


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Related to classical swine fever: African swine fever, Swine erysipelas

classical swine fever

n.
A highly infectious, often fatal viral disease of swine, characterized by fever, loss of appetite, and diarrhea. It occurs worldwide. Also called hog cholera.
References in periodicals archive ?
Postel is a veterinarian and the head of the Laboratory for Molecular Biology of the European Union and World Organisation for Animal Health Reference Laboratory for Classical Swine Fever at the Institute of Virology of the University of Veterinary Medicine in Hannover, Germany.
A highly sensitive and specific gel-based multiplex RT-PCR assay for the simultaneous and differential diagnosis of African swine fever and Classical swine fever in clinical samples.
Spatial analysis and modelling of classical swine fever outbreaks during 1997 in the Spanish province of Segovia.
Classical Swine Fever, also called Swine Cholera is a viral disease produced by a Pestivirus of the Flaviviridae family, Togavirus genus (RNA).
The idea of sharing the costs of disease control was first discussed after the 2000 Classical Swine Fever (CSF) outbreak and intensified after the 2001 foot-and-mouth outbreak, which cost the Treasury nearly pounds 3bn.
Outbreaks of classical swine fever have been reported at two pig farms in North-Rhine Westphalia in Germany, a region where the disease had been known to occur in wild boar.
There is concern they might transmit livestock diseases, such as classical swine fever, foot-and-mouth disease and bovine tuberculosis.
The UK used to export between 1,000 and 2,000 pigs a year to Japan, but the business was halted by an outbreak of classical swine fever in 2000.
The Agriculture and Forestry Ministry said the outbreak of what is medically known as classical swine fever (CSF) was detected Tuesday at a pig farm in Kangwon Province near the demilitarized zone in the northern part of the country.
In addition to FMD, classical swine fever -- formerly known as hog cholera -- would be the most likely biological weapon used to infect hogs.
The outbreak, which began in early August, is the first of classical swine fever in the UK since 1986.