classicism


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Related to classicism: neoclassicism, romanticism

clas·si·cism

 (klăs′ĭ-sĭz′əm) also clas·si·cal·ism (-kə-lĭz′əm)
n.
1. Aesthetic attitudes and principles manifested in the art, architecture, and literature of ancient Greece and Rome and characterized by emphasis on form, simplicity, proportion, and restraint.
2. Adherence to the aesthetic values embodied in ancient Greek and Roman art, architecture, and literature.
3. Classical scholarship.
4. A Greek or Latin expression or idiom.

classicism

(ˈklæsɪˌsɪzəm) or

classicalism

n
1. (Art Terms) a style based on the study of Greek and Roman models, characterized by emotional restraint and regularity of form, associated esp with the 18th century in Europe; the antithesis of romanticism. Compare neoclassicism
2. knowledge or study of the culture of ancient Greece and Rome
3.
a. a Greek or Latin form or expression
b. an expression in a modern language, such as English, that is modelled on a Greek or Latin form

clas•si•cism

(ˈklæs əˌsɪz əm)

also clas•si•cal•ism

(-ɪ kəˌlɪz əm)

n.
1. the principles or styles characteristic of the literature and art of ancient Greece and Rome.
2. adherence to such principles.
3. the classical style in literature and art, or adherence to its principles.
4. a Greek or Latin idiom or form, esp. one used in some other language.
5. classical scholarship or learning.
[1820–30]
clas`si•cis′tic, adj.

classicism

1. formerly, an imitation of Greek and Roman art.
2. currently, a dedication to the principles of that art: clarity of execution, balance, adherence to recognized standards of form, and conscious craftsmanship. — classicist, n.classicistic, adj.
See also: Art
1. the employment of compositional formulas and decorative techniques based upon the architecture of ancient Greece or Rome, but often including new ideas.
2. the employment of formulas and decorative techniques with an emphasis upon the subordination of utility in order to stress perfection of form.
See also: Architecture
a literary style characterized by formal adherence to traditions of structure, content, and genre. — classicist, n. — classicize, v.
See also: Literary Style
the principles or style of classic art or literature. — classicist, n.
See also: Antiquity
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.classicism - a movement in literature and art during the 17th and 18th centuries in Europe that favored rationality and restraint and strict forms; "classicism often derived its models from the ancient Greeks and Romans"
artistic style, idiom - the style of a particular artist or school or movement; "an imaginative orchestral idiom"
arts, humanistic discipline, humanities, liberal arts - studies intended to provide general knowledge and intellectual skills (rather than occupational or professional skills); "the college of arts and sciences"
Romantic Movement, Romanticism - a movement in literature and art during the late 18th and early 19th centuries that celebrated nature rather than civilization; "Romanticism valued imagination and emotion over rationality"
Translations

classicism

[ˈklæsɪsɪzəm] Nclasicismo m

classicism

[ˈklæsɪsɪzəm] n (ART)classicisme m

classicism

nKlassik f; (= style of classic architecture)Klassizismus m

classicism

[ˈklæˌsɪsɪzm] nclassicismo
References in classic literature ?
If Gringoire had lived in our day, what a fine middle course he would hold between classicism and romanticism!
Two of the most important contrasting tendencies of style in the general sense are Classicism and Romanticism.
Although contemporary discussions of art and literature are less frequently conducted in terms of the opposition of Classicism and Romanticism than they once were, the pervasive use of these terms during the last two centuries has left its mark.
Buen Gusto and Classicism in the Visual Cultures of Latin America, 1780-1910
SEVERAL CURRENTS run through "Chaos and Classicism," an unusual show about representational art in France, Italy, and Germany entre les guerres.
Together the Prizes are the Most Significant Recognition for Classicism in the Contemporary Built Environment
D, DPhil, Cicero, Classicism, and Popular Culture examines the seminal contributions that Greek poet, philosopher, writer, and scholar Marcus Tullius Cicero (106-43 BC) has made to Western civilization in general, and modern popular culture in specific.
Critically acclaimed as one of the finest quality office buildings in Chicago, it was developed in 1992 and designed by the world renowned Ricardo Bofill in his modern classicism style, with architecture by DeStefano and Partners.
No opener could have proclaimed this a company rooted in classicism better than Balanchine's Divertimento No.
Karan said she opted for this presentation instead of a traditional runway show because she wanted retail buyers and fashion editors to see ``the full message'' that focuses on classicism and richness.
This last consideration is too often forgotten in the tiresomely polarised debate about modernism and classicism which continues to rage.
GODOLPHIN suffered a blow when newcomer CLASSICISM broke down in the final strides of the first division of the Quidhampton Maiden Fillies' Stakes at Salisbury yesterday.