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Related to classicistic: Classicist style
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Adj.1.classicistic - of or relating to classicism; "the classicistic tradition"
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There is a kind of classicistic subtlety in many of his designs, and even the more definitively "Baroque" ones show a measure of restraint in the tense but elegant curves and powerfully massed columns and pilasters that characterize so much of his work.
Rhodes' acknowledgement of the need for Home Rule in minor matters within the colonies, as concomitant to his greater ideal of a larger English hegemony (much like the Roman imperial custom), made Rhodes enthusiastic also for the preservation of Cape Dutch architecture and the extension of its style, interwoven with the classicistic "Palladian" style of Jones and Wren, which we have seen was already established in South Africa in various forms.
Just as Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel and Franz Grillparzer had rebuked Weber for violating their classicistic ideals of musical beauty in Freischutz and Euryanthe so too did Berlioz's detractors, like Franz Brendel, criticize him for emphasizing "character" to such a degree that his music seemed to sacrifice unity of mood and to deny the true nature of instrumental music.
Sumarokov markedly increases the solemnity of the lines by elevating Fleming's "PRinzessin" to "tsaritsa" and "Muhme" to "soiuznitsa," already hinting at Sumarokov's instinctive (not consciously pragmatic) toning down of Fleming's Baroque exuberance to Classicistic coolness--alluded to by Slobodskaia in general terms.
Lorenzo (1483/88-1523/24) then goes on to amplify and expand the Rizzo mode by infusing it with new classicistic ideals.
The show includes many works testifying to this materialist impulse: the barely modeled rough rolls of clay of The Dance, 1911, which substitutes the elan and precarious equilibrium of Degas (as could be verified in Dallas, thanks to his inclusion) with the painful torsion of inert matter; the fractured waists of both Torso Without Arms or Head, 1909, and Standing Nude (Katia), 1950; and the highly visible gashes left by the knife in The Back II, 1913, and The Back III, 1916-17, for example, but also on the back of his most classicistic figure, the Large Seated Nude of 1922-29, whose pose was borrowed from Michelangelo.