Clattering


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Related to Clattering: chattering, rattling

clat·ter

 (klăt′ər)
v. clat·tered, clat·ter·ing, clat·ters
v.intr.
1. To make a rattling sound.
2. To move with a rattling sound: clattering along on roller skates.
3. To talk rapidly and noisily; chatter.
v.tr.
To cause to make a rattling sound.
n.
1. A rattling sound: the clatter of dishes in the kitchen.
2. A loud disturbance; a racket: the clatter of the subway train.
3. Noisy talk; chatter.

[Middle English clateren, from Old English *clatrian; see gal- in Indo-European roots.]

clat′ter·er n.
clat′ter·y adj.

Clattering

 a flock of choughs, 1430.
References in classic literature ?
As the chief justice lingered an instant at the door a trumpet sounded within, and the regiment came clattering forth and galloped down the street.
He could not see it, the inside of the bunker coated with coal-dust being perfectly and impenetrably black; but he heard it sliding and clattering, and striking here and there, always in the neighbourhood of his head.
I did; whereupon began a heaving, stamping, clattering process, accompanied by a barking and baying which removed me effectually some yards' distance; but I would not be driven quite away till I saw the event.
and clattering and thundering over the stones two horses dashed into the yard with a heavy engine behind them.
Jordan Henderson (for Allen 64) 6: Fitness was tested by one clattering challenge by Tyler Robert.
THERE is something magical about The Corn Mill at Clattering Ford.
The racket is like a drawer of silver clattering to the floor.
Instead of bringing joy to the people there, his macabre Christmas sees clattering bones replacing jingling bells and lovely toys supplanted by demon dolls and an axe-wielding puppet.
It wasn't the beauty of the buildings or the fact that, instead of clattering cobblestones, water lapped softly at their feet.
com)-- Clattering Sparrows is a heartwarming and compelling story of friendship centered on the fascinating and addictive game of Mahjong.
WATCHING events unfold in Europe over the last few weeks, I'm reminded of Winston Churchill and his famous quote from the Edwin Milliken poem: Who is in charge of the clattering train, The axles creak and the couplings strain, And the pace is hot and the points are near, And sleep hath deafened the driver''s ear, And the signals flash through the night in vain, For death is in charge of the clattering train.
Many people suffer from clattering and clanging badly fitting manhole covers.