clause


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Related to clause: subordinate clause

clause

Clauses are groups of words that contain both a subject and a predicate.
There are two main types of clauses: independent clauses, which can function independently as sentences, and dependent clauses, which depend on an independent clause to form a sentence.
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clause

 (klôz)
n.
1. Grammar A group of words containing a subject and a predicate and forming part of a compound or complex sentence.
2. A distinct article, stipulation, or provision in a document.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Medieval Latin clausa, close of a rhetorical period, from feminine of Latin clausus, past participle of claudere, to close.]

claus′al (klô′zəl) adj.

clause

(klɔːz)
n
1. (Grammar) grammar a group of words, consisting of a subject and a predicate including a finite verb, that does not necessarily constitute a sentence. See also main clause, subordinate clause, coordinate clause
2. (Law) a section of a legal document such as a contract, will, or draft statute
[C13: from Old French, from Medieval Latin clausa a closing (of a rhetorical period), back formation from Latin clausula, from claudere to close]
ˈclausal adj

clause

(klɔz)

n.
1. a syntactic construction containing a subject and predicate and forming part of a sentence or constituting a whole simple sentence.
2. a distinct article or provision in a contract, treaty, will, or other formal or legal written document.
[1175–1225; Middle English claus(e) (< Anglo-French) < Medieval Latin clausa, back formation from Latin clausula closing of something written, derivative of claus(us), past participle of claudere to close]
claus′al, adj.

clause

A group of words that forms part of a sentence, usually containing a subject and a predicate.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.clause - (grammar) an expression including a subject and predicate but not constituting a complete sentence
grammar - the branch of linguistics that deals with syntax and morphology (and sometimes also deals with semantics)
sentence - a string of words satisfying the grammatical rules of a language; "he always spoke in grammatical sentences"
grammatical construction, construction, expression - a group of words that form a constituent of a sentence and are considered as a single unit; "I concluded from his awkward constructions that he was a foreigner"
independent clause, main clause - a clause in a complex sentence that can stand alone as a complete sentence
coordinate clause - a clause in a complex sentence that is grammatically equivalent to the main clause and that performs the same grammatical function
dependent clause, subordinate clause - a clause in a complex sentence that cannot stand alone as a complete sentence and that functions within the sentence as a noun or adjective or adverb
relative clause - a clause introduced by a relative pronoun; "`who visits frequently' is a relative clause in the sentence `John, who visits frequently, is ill'"
2.clause - a separate section of a legal document (as a statute or contract or will)clause - a separate section of a legal document (as a statute or contract or will)
section, subdivision - a self-contained part of a larger composition (written or musical); "he always turns first to the business section"; "the history of this work is discussed in the next section"
arbitration clause - a clause in a contract providing for arbitration of disputes arising under the contract
deductible - a clause in an insurance policy that relieves the insurer of responsibility to pay the initial loss up to a stated amount
double indemnity - a clause in an insurance policy that provides for double the face value of the policy in the case of accidental death
escalator, escalator clause - a clause in a contract that provides for an increase or a decrease in wages or prices or benefits etc. depending on certain conditions (as a change in the cost of living index)
joker - an inconspicuous clause in a document or bill that affects its meaning in a way that is not immediately apparent; "when I demanded my money he showed me the joker in the contract"
reserve clause - a clause that used to be part of the contract with a professional athlete extending the contract for a year beyond its expiration; "the reserve clause was used to bind players to a particular ball club"
rider - a clause that is appended to a legislative bill
document, papers, written document - writing that provides information (especially information of an official nature)
contract - a binding agreement between two or more persons that is enforceable by law

clause

noun section, condition, article, item, chapter, rider, provision, passage, point, part, heading, paragraph, specification, proviso, stipulation There is a clause in his contract which entitles him to a percentage of the profits.
Translations
عِبارَه، جُمْلَه مُعْتَمِدَهفَقْرَه، بَنْدمَادَّة
klauzuleodstavecvěta
paragrafafsnitklausulledsætning
KlauselNebensatzTeilsatzclause
lakipykälälause
klauzula
cikkelymellékmondat
klásúla, ákvæîisetning
条項
조항
sakinysskirsnis
pantsteikums
clausulenevenschikkingbijzin
glavni stavekstavek
klausul
มาตรา
maddecümlecik
điều khoản

clause

[klɔːz] N (Ling) → oración f; (in contract, law) → cláusula f; (in will) → disposición f

clause

[ˈklɔːz] n
[contract] → clause f
(GRAMMAR) [sentence] → proposition f main clause, subordinate clause

clause

n
(Gram) → Satz m
(Jur etc) → Klausel f

clause

[klɔːz] n (Gram) → proposizione f; (in contract, law, will) → clausola

clause

(kloːz) noun
1. a part of a sentence having its own subject and predicate, eg either of the two parts of this sentence. The sentence `Mary has a friend who is rich' contains a main clause and a subordinate (relative) clause.
2. a paragraph in a contract, will, or act of parliament.

clause

مَادَّة klauzule paragraf Klausel ρήτρα cláusula lakipykälä clause klauzula clausola 条項 조항 clausule klausul klauzula cláusula статья klausul มาตรา madde điều khoản 条款
References in classic literature ?
But the clause relating to the money is too important to be passed over.
The memorandum-book begins with the well-known words saying that `the management of the Opera shall give to the performance of the National Academy of Music the splendor that becomes the first lyric stage in France' and ends with Clause 98, which says that the privilege can be withdrawn if the manager infringes the conditions stipulated in the memorandum-book.
The clause I now read is as plainly written in the Constitution as any other of its provisions:
But it is not difficult to account, either for this restriction on the general government, or for the manner in which the whole clause is expressed.
The clause which - at my death - makes you sole owner of the whole concession.
You will find that the clause which devises the whole residue of your husband's estate to Admiral Bartram ends in these terms: to be by him applied to such uses as he may think fit.
Cornelius heard this clause, but, the first feeling of vexation and disappointment over, he said to himself, --
Yes; but listen to this clause, my dear Planchet, and if you do not find it equitable in every respect when it is written, well, we can scratch it out again: --
The first clause provided for the safe keeping and support of his animals.
Therefore, the conditional clause he proposed was, that, if the minion should return in his late sneaking manner, and if, being closely watched, he should be found to possess himself of anything, no matter what, the sharp sword impending over his head should be instantly shown him, he should be strictly examined as to what he knew or suspected, should be severely handled by them his masters, and should be kept in a state of abject moral bondage and slavery until the time when they should see fit to permit him to purchase his freedom at the price of half his possessions.
Everything honourable and soothing, every present enjoyment, and every future hope was contained in it; and her acceptance, with only the saving clause of Papa and Mamma's approbation, was eagerly given.
The only part of his Will which exposed itself to unfavorable criticism, was a clause conferring a legacy on one of his sisters (then a widow) who had estranged herself from her family by marrying beneath her.