clavicle


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

clav·i·cle

 (klăv′ĭ-kəl)
n.
1. Either of two slender bones in humans that extend from the manubrium of the sternum to the acromion of the scapula. Also called collarbone.
2. One of the bones of the pectoral girdle in many vertebrates.

[New Latin clāvīcula, from Latin, diminutive of clāvis, key (from its shape).]

cla·vic′u·lar (klə-vĭk′yə-lər) adj.
cla·vic′u·late′ (-lāt′) adj.

clavicle

(ˈklævɪkəl)
n
1. (Anatomy) either of the two bones connecting the shoulder blades with the upper part of the breastbone. Nontechnical name: collarbone
2. (Zoology) the corresponding structure in other vertebrates
[C17: from Medieval Latin clāvicula, from Latin clāvis key]
clavicular adj
claviculate adj

clav•i•cle

(ˈklæv ɪ kəl)

n.
either of two slender bones of the pectoral girdle that connect the sternum and the scapula; collarbone.
[1605–15; < Medieval Latin clāvicula collarbone, Latin: tendril, door bolt, little key =clāvi(s) key + -cula -cle1]
cla•vic•u•lar (kləˈvɪk yə lər) adj.
cla•vic′u•late` (-yəˌleɪt) adj.

clav·i·cle

(klăv′ĭ-kəl)
Either of two slender bones in humans and other primates that extend from the upper part of the sternum to the shoulder. Also called collarbone. See more at skeleton.

clavicle

Either of the two collarbones, linking the scapulae to the sternum.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.clavicle - bone linking the scapula and sternumclavicle - bone linking the scapula and sternum
bone, os - rigid connective tissue that makes up the skeleton of vertebrates
arteria subclavia, subclavian artery - either of two arteries that supply blood to the neck and arms
endoskeleton - the internal skeleton; bony and cartilaginous structure (especially of vertebrates)
Translations
klíční kost
solisluu
viðbein

clavicle

[ˈklævɪkl] Nclavícula f

clavicle

[ˈklævɪkəl] n (ANATOMY) (= collar bone) → clavicule f

clavicle

clavicle

[ˈklævɪkl] n (Anat) → clavicola

clav·i·cle

n. clavícula, hueso de la faja pectoral que conecta al esternón con la escápula.

clavicle

n clavícula
References in classic literature ?
There is a groove upon its surface showing that a great tendon played across it, which could not be the case with a clavicle.
The company currently markets the Sonoma CRx clavicle fracture repair device, the Sonoma WRx (TM) wrist fracture repair device, and the Sonoma HMRx (TM) humerus fracture repair device.
1) obtained at the time of the initial injury at an outside institution revealed ipsilateral fractures of the lateral one-third of the clavicle and coracoid base.
The 29 chapters in this manual describe the diagnosis and treatment of injuries to the spine, clavicle, joints, shoulder, humerus, elbow, hand, pelvis, hip, femur, knee, and ankle.
The 12 shoulders were repaired using the three different techniques all of which consisted of affixation through a drill hole in the clavicle and around the coracoid with a suture.
Therefore, the vagus nerve was severed at the level of the clavicle.
The stricken jockey was taken to Yeovil Hospital where he was confirmed to have fractured his clavicle and scapula bone.
The reason is that many shoulder dystocias result in Erb's palsy (paralysis of shoulder and upper arm muscles), fractures of the clavicle or humerus or even death.
Ai-Medic is a leading supplier of orthopedic products in the Japanese market, especially in the area of clavicle fracture fixation.
A dislocated shoulder is no joke; I popped my clavicle many years ago and it was absolute agony.