clawback


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claw·back

 (klô′băk′)
n.
The recovery of money that has been disbursed, as by a government, pension, or company.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.clawback - finding a way to take money back from people that they were given in another way; "the Treasury will find some clawback for the extra benefits members received"
regaining, restitution, restoration, return - getting something back again; "upon the restitution of the book to its rightful owner the child was given a tongue lashing"
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
Translations

clawback

[ˈklɔːˌbæk] n (of tax, duty) → recupero
References in periodicals archive ?
allows directors to avoid a clawback by wrongly determining that there
The authority said the clawback of funds is because of a change in the way the rules are interpreted.
Mothballing mima could result in over pounds 10m clawback for grant funding for mima and the square.
Global Banking News-January 6, 2011--First International Bank does not have clawback provision in bonus plan(C)2011 ENPublishing - http://www.
and cut their expense accounts, Canadians would gladly see their military/RCMP veterans receive their full pensions without clawback at age 65.
The clawback payment is the amount states pay to the federal government to offset some of the added expense to Medicare Part D of assuming drug costs for the dual eligibles.
There's got to be a clawback system in remuneration itself, so that if things are not working in year two then there is a clawback that is possible.
This bank is now owned mostly by the people of Britain, so is this a clawback to help pay Sir Fred Goodwin's pounds 700,000-a-year pension?
It's almost a wash with the clawback,'' said Vic Miller, a senior fellow at the research group Federal Funds Information for States.
An unfortunate result of this lack of direction from Congress and the bench is the rising popularity of clawback and quick-peek agreements, (9) which may save lawyers time, but which may also raise a host of legal and ethical issues.
If, as Bush proposes, the accounts are to be inheritable assets, the heirs of people who die before reaching retirement age would presumably inherit the clawback as well.