clean up


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clean

 (klēn)
adj. clean·er, clean·est
1. Free from dirt, stain, or impurities; unsoiled: a clean kitchen floor; clean clothes.
2.
a. Free from foreign matter or pollution; unadulterated: clean air; clean drinking water.
b. Not infected: a clean wound.
3.
a. Producing relatively little pollution: a clean fuel; a cleaner, more efficient engine.
b. Producing relatively little radioactive fallout or contamination: a clean nuclear bomb.
4. Having no imperfections or blemishes; regular or even: a clean edge; a smooth, clean joint.
5.
a. Not ornate or intricate; spare: "the clean lines and exquisite proportions of early modernism" (Judith Thurman).
b. Sharply defined; clear-cut: a clean outline against the sky.
6. Free from clumsiness; deft; adroit: a clean throw.
7. Devoid of restrictions or encumbrances: a clean bill of health.
8. Thorough; complete: a clean getaway.
9. Having few alterations or corrections; legible: clean manuscript.
10. Blank: a clean page.
11.
a. Morally pure; virtuous: led a clean life.
b. Having no marks of discredit or offense: a clean voting record.
12. Fit for all readers, listeners, or audiences; not ribald or obscene: a clean joke.
13. Honest or fair: a clean fighter; a clean competition.
14. Slang
a. Not carrying concealed weapons or drugs.
b. Innocent of a suspected crime.
15. Informal
a. Free from narcotics addiction.
b. Showing no evidence of using banned or performance-enhancing substances: proven to be clean before the race.
adv. cleaner, cleanest
1. So as to be unsoiled: wash the dishes clean.
2. In a fair manner: played the game clean.
3. In a clean or nonpolluting manner: a fuel that burns clean.
4. Informal Entirely; wholly: clean forgot the appointment.
v. cleaned, clean·ing, cleans
v.tr.
1. To rid of dirt, rubbish, or impurities: clean a room; clean a suit.
2. To get rid of (impurities or dirt, for example); remove: cleaned up the trash; cleaned off the stains.
3. To prepare (fowl or other food) for cooking, as by removing the entrails or fat.
4. To remove the contents from; empty: cleaned my plate.
5. Sports To lift (a barbell) from the floor to the shoulders in one motion.
v.intr.
To undergo or perform an act of cleaning.
Phrasal Verbs:
clean out
1. To rid of dirt, rubbish, or impurities.
2. To empty of contents or occupants.
3. Informal To drive or force out: cleaned out the incompetent workers.
4. Slang To deprive completely of money or material wealth: The robbery cleaned us out.
clean up
1. To make clean or orderly.
2. To make oneself clean, neat, or presentable.
3. To dispose of; settle: cleaned up the unpaid bills.
4. Slang To make a large profit, often in a short period of time: cleaned up during the bull market.
Idiom:
clean house Slang
To eliminate or discard what is undesirable: The scandal forced the company to clean house.

[Middle English clene, from Old English clǣne.]

clean′a·ble adj.
clean′ness n.

clean up

vb (adverb)
1. to rid (something) of dirt, filth, or other impurities
2. to make (someone or something) orderly or presentable
3. (tr) to rid (a place) of undesirable people or conditions: the campaign against vice had cleaned up the city.
4. (intr) informal to make a great profit
n
5.
a. the process of cleaning up or eliminating something
b. (as modifier): a cleanup campaign.
6. informal chiefly US a great profit
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.clean up - put (things or places) in order; "Tidy up your room!"
make up, make - put in order or neaten; "make the bed"; "make up a room"
order - bring order to or into; "Order these files"
clean house, houseclean, clean - clean and tidy up the house; "She housecleans every week"
2.clean up - make a big profit; often in a short period of time; "The investor really cleaned up when the stock market went up"
turn a profit, profit - make a profit; gain money or materially; "The company has not profited from the merger"
3.clean up - dispose of; "settle the bills"
settle - dispose of; make a financial settlement
4.clean up - make oneself clean, presentable or neat; "Clean up before you go to the party"
neaten, groom - care for one's external appearance; "He is always well-groomed"

clean

adjective
1. Free from dirt, stain, or impurities:
2. Without imperfections or blemishes, as a line or contour:
3. Well done or executed:
5. Not lewd or obscene:
6. According to the rules:
adverb
Informal. To the fullest extent:
Informal: clear.
Idioms: in toto, through and through.
verb
1. To make or keep (an area) clean and orderly.Also used with up:
clear (up), neaten (up), police, spruce (up), straighten (up), tidy (up).
2. To make neat and trim; make presentable.Also used with up:
freshen (up), groom, neaten (up), slick up, spruce (up), tidy (up), trig (out), trim.
3. To make or become clear by the removal of impurities:
phrasal verb
clean out
1. To remove the contents of:
2. Slang. To reduce to financial insolvency:
phrasal verb
clean up
Slang. To make a large profit:
Translations
يُنَظِّفُ تَماما
ukliditvyčistit
gøre rent
takarít
hreinsun
iyice temizlemek

w>clean up

vt sep
(lit)sauber machen; old building, old paintingreinigen; messaufräumen; to clean oneself upsich sauber machen
(fig) the new mayor cleaned up the cityder neue Bürgermeister hat für Sauberkeit in der Stadt gesorgt; to clean up televisionden Bildschirm (von Gewalt, Sex etc) säubern ? act N d
vi
(lit)aufräumen
(inf)abkassieren (inf), → absahnen (inf); to clean up at the record stores/box office (CD/movie)voll abräumen (inf)

clean

(kliːn) adjective
1. free from dirt, smoke etc. a clean window; a clean dress.
2. neat and tidy in one's habits. Cats are very clean animals.
3. unused. a clean sheet of paper.
4. free from evil or indecency. a clean life; keep your language clean!
5. neat and even. a clean cut.
adverb
completely. He got clean away.
verb
to (cause to) become free from dirt etc. Will you clean the windows?
ˈcleaner noun
ˈcleanly adverb
The knife cut cleanly through the cheese.
cleanly (ˈklenli) adjective
clean in personal habits.
ˈcleanliness (ˈklen-) noun
clean up
to clean (a place) thoroughly. She cleaned (the room) up after they went home.
a clean bill of health
a certificate saying that a person, the crew of ship etc is entirely healthy (especially after being ill). I've been off work but I've got a clean bill of health now.
a clean slate
a fresh start. After being in prison he started his new job with a clean slate.
come clean
to tell the truth about something, often about something about which one has previously lied.
make a clean sweep
to get rid of everything unnecessary or unwanted. The new manager made a clean sweep of all the lazy people in the department.
References in periodicals archive ?
TWENTY four volunteers lent a hand to clean up the River Dee Black Cop.
Abu Dhabi: Volunteers in the capital gathered on Friday afternoon to clean up a mangrove as part of the Landmark Mangrove Project, organised by community organisation Green Abu Dhabi.
The Big Spring Clean Up is in its fourth year and involves litter picks, planting projects and community clean ups.
Property preservation ( prep for home foreclosures ), acting as a lawn and clean up broker to the banking system.
A COUPLE of days ago, I walked along Barassie beach towards Troon with my dogs (I always clean up after them).
MORE than 40 clean up events have been organised on April 27-29 ahead of the official opening of the Wales Coast Path.
The UK's largest beach clean and survey, it sees thousands of volunteers take to the sands to clean up and record rubbish.
DIVERS in North Tyneside are preparing to take a dip and clean up the seabed as part of a competition.
To help, or organise a clean up of a watercourse, contact Jessica Grinsted on (0191) 284-6884.
St Helens council is praised for work with utility companies to clean up graffitidaubed cable boxes and substations in the borough