clergy


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cler·gy

 (klûr′jē)
n. pl. cler·gies
The body of people ordained or recognized by a religious community as ritual or spiritual leaders. See Usage Note at collective noun.

[Middle English clergie, from Old French (from Vulgar Latin *clercīa, from Late Latin clēricus; see clerk) and from Old French clergié, body of clerks (from Vulgar Latin *clercātus, from Late Latin clēricātus, from clēricus, clerk, cleric).]

clergy

(ˈklɜːdʒɪ)
n, pl -gies
(Ecclesiastical Terms) the collective body of men and women ordained as religious ministers, esp of the Christian Church.
[C13: from Old French clergie, from clerc ecclesiastic, clerk]

cler•gy

(ˈklɜr dʒi)

n., pl. -gies.
the group or body of ordained persons in a religion, as distinguished from the laity.
[1175–1225; Middle English clerge, clergie < Old French clerge < Late Latin clericātus office of a priest; see cleric, -ate3]
cler′gy•like`, adj.
usage: See collective noun.

clergy

Religious leaders; a member of the Church.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.clergy - in Christianity, clergymen collectively (as distinguished from the laity)clergy - in Christianity, clergymen collectively (as distinguished from the laity)
priesthood - the body of ordained religious practitioners
pastorate - pastors collectively
prelacy, prelature - prelates collectively
cardinalate - cardinals collectively
clergyman, man of the cloth, reverend - a member of the clergy and a spiritual leader of the Christian Church
laity, temporalty - in Christianity, members of a religious community that do not have the priestly responsibilities of ordained clergy

clergy

noun priesthood, ministry, clerics, clergymen, churchmen, the cloth, holy orders, ecclesiastics The Bolsheviks closed churches and imprisoned the clergy.
Related words
adjectives clerical, pastoral
Quotations
"Clergy are men as well as other folks" [Henry Fielding Joseph Andrews]
Translations
إكليروس، رِجال الكهنوت
duchovenstvo
gejstlighedpræstestand
papisto
klersvećenstvo
klerkastétt
dvasininkasdvasininkija
garīdzniecība
rahipler/papazlar sınıfı

clergy

[ˈklɜːdʒɪ] NPLclero m

clergy

[ˈklɜːrdʒi] nclergé m

clergy

plKlerus m, → Geistlichkeit f, → die Geistlichen pl; to join the clergyGeistlicher werden

clergy

[ˈklɜːdʒɪ] nclero

clergy

(ˈkləːdʒi) noun
the ministers, priests etc of the Christian religion. the clergy of the Church of England.
ˈclergyman noun
one of the clergy; a priest, minister etc.
References in classic literature ?
Much ill-will would also have been required, not to comprehend, through the medium of the poetry of the prologue, that Labor was wedded to Merchandise, and Clergy to Nobility, and that the two happy couples possessed in common a magnificent golden dolphin, which they desired to adjudge to the fairest only.
This excuse she stated before a great council of the clergy of England, as the sole reason for her having taken the religious habit.
The Spaniards, through the Catholic clergy, offer praise to God for their victory over the French on the fourteenth of June, and the French, also through the Catholic clergy, offer praise because on that same fourteenth of June they defeated the Spaniards.
If it be The Black Wolf," whispered Father Claude to the boy, "no worse fate could befall us for he preys ever upon the clergy, and when drunk as he now is, he murders his victims.
But although Robin fought against the clergy, the friars and monks who did wrong, he did not fight against religion.
the families of the inferior clergy, appear stranger than they can
I say it only shows his foolish, impious pride, and abominable, devilish rebellion against the reverend clergy.
It is not there that respectable people of any denomination can do most good; and it certainly is not there that the influence of the clergy can be most felt.
Riley, "you're quite under a mistake about the clergy; all the best schoolmasters are of the clergy.
We have little patience with those liberal clergy who dwell on nothing else than the difficulties of faith and the propriety of concession to the opposite force.
We clergy keep our hearts warm and our heads cool, and we hold a judicious middle course.
The amphitheatre was packed, from the bull-ring to the highest row - twelve thousand people in one circling mass, one slanting, solid mass - royalties, nobles, clergy, ladies, gentlemen, state officials, generals, admirals, soldiers, sailors, lawyers, thieves, merchants, brokers, cooks, housemaids, scullery-maids, doubtful women, dudes, gamblers, beggars, loafers, tramps, American ladies, gentlemen, preachers, English ladies, gentlemen, preachers, German ditto, French ditto, and so on and so on, all the world represented: Spaniards to admire and praise, foreigners to enjoy and go home and find fault - there they were, one solid, sloping, circling sweep of rippling and flashing color under the downpour of the summer sun - just a garden, a gaudy, gorgeous flower-garden