clergy


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cler·gy

 (klûr′jē)
n. pl. cler·gies
The body of people ordained or recognized by a religious community as ritual or spiritual leaders. See Usage Note at collective noun.

[Middle English clergie, from Old French (from Vulgar Latin *clercīa, from Late Latin clēricus; see clerk) and from Old French clergié, body of clerks (from Vulgar Latin *clercātus, from Late Latin clēricātus, from clēricus, clerk, cleric).]

clergy

(ˈklɜːdʒɪ)
n, pl -gies
(Ecclesiastical Terms) the collective body of men and women ordained as religious ministers, esp of the Christian Church.
[C13: from Old French clergie, from clerc ecclesiastic, clerk]

cler•gy

(ˈklɜr dʒi)

n., pl. -gies.
the group or body of ordained persons in a religion, as distinguished from the laity.
[1175–1225; Middle English clerge, clergie < Old French clerge < Late Latin clericātus office of a priest; see cleric, -ate3]
cler′gy•like`, adj.
usage: See collective noun.

clergy

Religious leaders; a member of the Church.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Switch to new thesaurus
Noun1.clergy - in Christianity, clergymen collectively (as distinguished from the laity)clergy - in Christianity, clergymen collectively (as distinguished from the laity)
priesthood - the body of ordained religious practitioners
pastorate - pastors collectively
prelacy, prelature - prelates collectively
cardinalate - cardinals collectively
clergyman, man of the cloth, reverend - a member of the clergy and a spiritual leader of the Christian Church
laity, temporalty - in Christianity, members of a religious community that do not have the priestly responsibilities of ordained clergy

clergy

noun priesthood, ministry, clerics, clergymen, churchmen, the cloth, holy orders, ecclesiastics The Bolsheviks closed churches and imprisoned the clergy.
Related words
adjectives clerical, pastoral
Quotations
"Clergy are men as well as other folks" [Henry Fielding Joseph Andrews]
Translations

clergy

[ˈklɜːdʒɪ] NPLclero m

clergy

[ˈklɜːrdʒi] nclergé m

clergy

plKlerus m, → Geistlichkeit f, → die Geistlichen pl; to join the clergyGeistlicher werden

clergy

[ˈklɜːdʒɪ] nclero

clergy

(ˈkləːdʒi) noun
the ministers, priests etc of the Christian religion. the clergy of the Church of England.
ˈclergyman noun
one of the clergy; a priest, minister etc.
References in classic literature ?
I say it only shows his foolish, impious pride, and abominable, devilish rebellion against the reverend clergy.
O, because I have had only that kind of benevolence which consists in lying on a sofa, and cursing the church and clergy for not being martyrs and confessors.
The king sat under a canopy of state; about him were clustered a large body of the clergy in full canonicals.
The amphitheatre was packed, from the bull-ring to the highest row - twelve thousand people in one circling mass, one slanting, solid mass - royalties, nobles, clergy, ladies, gentlemen, state officials, generals, admirals, soldiers, sailors, lawyers, thieves, merchants, brokers, cooks, housemaids, scullery-maids, doubtful women, dudes, gamblers, beggars, loafers, tramps, American ladies, gentlemen, preachers, English ladies, gentlemen, preachers, German ditto, French ditto, and so on and so on, all the world represented: Spaniards to admire and praise, foreigners to enjoy and go home and find fault - there they were, one solid, sloping, circling sweep of rippling and flashing color under the downpour of the summer sun - just a garden, a gaudy, gorgeous flower-garden
I am a clergyman," he said; "and the clergy are often appealed to about odd matters.
As I was saying; if Monsieur Manette had not died; if he had suddenly and silently disappeared; if he had been spirited away; if it had not been difficult to guess to what dreadful place, though no art could trace him; if he had an enemy in some compatriot who could exercise a privilege that I in my own time have known the boldest people afraid to speak of in a whisper, across the water there; for instance, the privilege of filling up blank forms for the consignment of any one to the oblivion of a prison for any length of time; if his wife had implored the king, the queen, the court, the clergy, for any tidings of him, and all quite in vain;--then the history of your father would have been the history of this unfortunate gentleman, the Doctor of Beauvais.
Yet so loose were the ideas of the times respecting the conduct of the clergy, whether secular or regular, that the Prior Aymer maintained a fair character in the neighbourhood of his abbey.
These were searched and sought out through the whole nation, by the prince and his wisest counsellors, among such of the priesthood as were most deservedly distinguished by the sanctity of their lives, and the depth of their erudition; who were indeed the spiritual fathers of the clergy and the people.
He knew the present temper of the people, that those of the greatest interest and power were by no means pleased with the changes of religion, and only waited for a fair opportunity to revolt; and that these discontents were everywhere heightened by the monks and clergy.
And he has also left other directions which the clergy of the village say should not and must not be obeyed because they savour of paganism.
My chief war is against the clergy and barons of the land who bear down upon the poor.
This salon, in which the lesser nobility, the clergy, and the magistracy meet together, exerts a great influence.