client

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cli·ent

 (klī′ənt)
n.
1. The party for which professional services are rendered, as by an attorney.
2. A customer or patron: clients of the hotel.
3. A person using the services of a social services agency.
4. One that depends on the protection of another.
5. A client state.
6. Computers A computer or program that can download files for manipulation, run applications, or request application-based services from a file server.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin cliēns, client-, dependent, follower; see klei- in Indo-European roots.]

cli′ent·age (-ən-tĭj) n.
cli·en′tal (klī-ĕn′tl, klī′ən-) adj.

client

(ˈklaɪənt)
n
1. a person, company, etc, that seeks the advice of a professional man or woman
2. (Commerce) a customer
3. (Social Welfare) a person who is registered with or receiving services or financial aid from a welfare agency
4. (Computer Science) computing a program or work station that requests data or information from a server
5. a person depending on another's patronage
[C14: from Latin cliēns retainer, dependant; related to Latin clīnāre to lean]
cliental adj

cli•ent

(ˈklaɪ ənt)

n.
1. a person or group that uses the professional advice or services of a lawyer, accountant, architect, etc.
2. a person who is receiving the benefits, services, etc., of a social welfare agency, a government bureau, etc.
3. a customer.
4. anyone under the patronage of another; a dependent.
6. a workstation on a network that gains access to central data files, programs, and peripheral devices through a server.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin client-, s. of cliēns person seeking the protection or influence of someone powerful]
cli•en•tal (klaɪˈɛn tl, ˈklaɪ ən tl) adj.
cli′ent•less, adj.

customer

client
1. 'customer'

A customer is someone who buys something, especially from a shop.

She's one of our regular customers.
2. 'client'

A client is a person or company that receives a service from a professional person or organization in return for payment.

A solicitor and his client were sitting at the next table.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.client - a person who seeks the advice of a lawyerclient - a person who seeks the advice of a lawyer
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
case - a person requiring professional services; "a typical case was the suburban housewife described by a marriage counselor"
attorney-client relation, lawyer-client relation - the responsibility of a lawyer to act in the best interests of the client
2.client - someone who pays for goods or servicesclient - someone who pays for goods or services
consumer - a person who uses goods or services
buyer, emptor, purchaser, vendee - a person who buys
guest - a customer of a hotel or restaurant etc.
frequenter, patron - a regular customer
policyholder - a person who holds an insurance policy; usually, the client in whose name an insurance policy is written
shopper - someone who visits stores in search of articles to buy
disburser, expender, spender - someone who spends money to purchase goods or services
reader, subscriber - someone who contracts to receive and pay for a service or a certain number of issues of a publication
taker - one who accepts an offer
warrantee - a customer to whom a warrant or guarantee is given
whoremaster, whoremonger, john, trick - a prostitute's customer
business relation - a relation between different business enterprises
3.client - (computer science) any computer that is hooked up to a computer network
computer network - (computer science) a network of computers
computer science, computing - the branch of engineering science that studies (with the aid of computers) computable processes and structures

client

noun customer, consumer, buyer, patron, shopper, habitué, patient The company requires clients to pay substantial fees in advance.

client

noun
One who buys goods or services:
Translations
زَبُونزُبونمُوكّل
klientzákazník
klientkunde
asiakas
clientmaître d’ouvrage
klijentklijentica
ügyfélkliens
kaupandikúnniskjólstæîingurviðskiptavinurviîskiptavinur
依頼人
의뢰인
klientaiklientasklientūra
klientspastāvīgs pircējs/pasūtītājs
klient
stranka
klient
ลูกค้า
khách hàng

client

[ˈklaɪənt]
A. Ncliente/a m/f
my client (in court) → mi defendido
B. CPD client state N (Pol) → estado m satélite, estado m cliente

client

[ˈklaɪənt] n [professional person] → client(e) m/fclient base nclientèle f régulière, fonds m de clientèle

client

n
Kunde m, → Kundin f; (of solicitor)Klient(in) m(f); (of barrister)Mandant(in) m(f)
(US, receiving welfare) → Bezieher(in) m(f)

client

[ˈklaɪənt] ncliente m/f

client

(ˈklaiənt) noun
1. a person who receives professional advice from a lawyer, accountant etc.
2. a customer. That hairdresser is very popular with his clients.
clientèle (kliːonˈtel) noun
a group or type of clients. a bank's clientele.

client

زَبُون klient klient Kunde πελάτης cliente asiakas client klijent cliente 依頼人 의뢰인 cliënt klient klient cliente клиент klient ลูกค้า müşteri khách hàng 客户
References in classic literature ?
Her clients said that Lena `had style,' and overlooked her habitual inaccuracies.
I refer to 'chief' surgeons; but considering the exalted positions occupied by our clients, it will be well and decorous that each of us appoint several consulting surgeons, from among the highest in the profession.
I venture to remind you of this, because you have the affairs of hundreds of clients to think of, and you might well have forgotten the circumstance.
We were a little like undertakers, in the Commons, as regarded Probate transactions; generally making it a rule to look more or less cut up, when we had to deal with clients in mourning.
The room was but small, and the clients seemed to have had a habit of backing up against the wall: the wall, especially opposite to Mr.
Three noblemen sent their carriages to the funeral, and the friends and clients of Mr.
Her clients refuse to stand in line and quietly wait their turn, as they are quite willing to do in stores and theatres and barber shops and railway stations and everywhere else.
I neglected my clients and my own business to give myself to the contemplation of the mysteries which I had once beheld, yet which I could impart to no one, and found daily more difficult to reproduce even before my own mental vision.
Afterwards he found that the vague feeling of alarm had spread to the clients of the underground railway, and that the Sunday excursionists began to return from all over the South-Western "lung"--Barnes, Wimbledon, Richmond Park, Kew, and so forth--at unnaturally early hours; but not a soul had anything more than vague hearsay to tell of.
I know you are not rich, Madame Coquenard, and that your husband is obliged to bleed his poor clients to squeeze a few paltry crowns from them.
There were no foreclosures of mortgages, no protested notes, no bills payable, no debts of honour in Typee; no unreasonable tailors and shoemakers perversely bent on being paid; no duns of any description and battery attorneys, to foment discord, backing their clients up to a quarrel, and then knocking their heads together; no poor relations, everlastingly occupying the spare bed-chamber, and diminishing the elbow room at the family table; no destitute widows with their children starving on the cold charities of the world; no beggars; no debtors' prisons; no proud and hard-hearted nabobs in Typee; or to sum up all in one word--no Money
Whether the Baroness Burmergelm will take this circumstance into consideration when I come to beg her pardon (for I do intend to make her amends) I do not know; but I doubt if she will, and the less so since, so far as I know, the circumstance is one which, of late, has begun to be abused in the legal world, in that advocates in criminal cases have taken to justifying their clients on the ground that, at the moment of the crime, they (the clients) were unconscious of what they were doing--that, in short, they were out of health.