clipper


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clip·per

 (klĭp′ər)
n.
1. One that cuts, shears, or clips.
2. often clippers An instrument or tool for cutting, clipping, or shearing: nail clippers.
3. Nautical A fast, square-rigged ship developed in the mid-19th century, having a sharp bow, tall masts, and a large sail area.
4. One that moves very fast.
5. Electronics See limiter.

clipper

(ˈklɪpə)
n
1. (Nautical Terms) any fast sailing ship
2. a person or thing that cuts or clips
3. something, such as a horse or sled, that moves quickly
4. (Electronics) electronics another word for limiter

clip•per

(ˈklɪp ər)

n.
1. a person or thing that clips or cuts.
2. Often, clippers. (often used with a pl. v.) a cutting tool, esp. shears: hedge clippers.
3. Usu., clippers. (usu. used with a pl. v.) a mechanical or electric tool for cutting hair, fingernails, or the like.
4. a swift sailing vessel, esp. a three-masted ship built in the U.S. c1845–70.
5. a person or thing that moves along swiftly.
[1350–1400]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.clipper - (electronics) a nonlinear electronic circuit whose output is limited in amplitude; used to limit the instantaneous amplitude of a waveform (to clip off the peaks of a waveform); "a limiter introduces amplitude distortion"
circuit, electric circuit, electrical circuit - an electrical device that provides a path for electrical current to flow
electronics - the branch of physics that deals with the emission and effects of electrons and with the use of electronic devices
2.clipper - a fast sailing ship used in former timesclipper - a fast sailing ship used in former times
sailing ship, sailing vessel - a vessel that is powered by the wind; often having several masts
3.clipper - shears for cutting grass or shrubbery (often used in the plural)clipper - shears for cutting grass or shrubbery (often used in the plural)
shears - large scissors with strong blades
4.clipper - scissors for cutting hair or finger nails (often used in the plural)
pair of scissors, scissors - an edge tool having two crossed pivoting blades
Translations
سَفينَه شِراعِيَّه سَريعَهمِقراض
nůžkyplachetnice
klipper
nyírógép
klippurseglskip
clipper
hızlı yelkenlimakassürat teknesi

clipper

[ˈklɪpəʳ] N (Naut) → clíper m

clipper

[ˈklɪpər] n (= ship) → clipper m

clipper

n (Naut) → Klipper m; (Aviat) → Clipper m

clipper

[ˈklɪpəʳ] n (Naut) → clipper m inv

clip1

(klip) past tense past participle clipped verb
1. to cut (foliage, an animal's hair etc) with scissors or shears. The shepherd clipped the sheep; The hedge was clipped.
2. to strike sharply. She clipped him over the ear.
noun
1. an act of clipping.
2. a sharp blow. a clip on the ear.
3. a short piece of film. a video clip.
ˈclipper noun
1. (in plural) a tool for clipping. hedge-clippers; nail-clippers.
2. a type of fast sailing-ship.
ˈclipping noun
a thing clipped off or out of something, especially a newspaper. She collects clippings about the royal family.
References in classic literature ?
At all events,' walking me briskly on, 'I have bought a boat that was for sale - a clipper, Mr.
This time the clerks evinced no inclination to laugh, such a real ear clipper did Porthos appear.
The Tweed had been a wooden vessel, and he brought the tradition of quick passages with him into the iron clipper.
I know Bank ways ain't clipper ways, but he hain't much to learn.
We shall have to catch the Aurora, and she has a name for being a clipper.
I had come out of a crack Australian clipper, where I had been third officer, and he seemed to have a prejudice against crack clippers as aristocratic and high-toned.
This was something different from the captains' wives I had known on board crack clippers.
Alongside them were clippers of all sizes, steamers of all nationalities, and the steamboats, with several decks rising one above the other, which ply on the Sacramento and its tributaries.
The Gloria Scott had been in the Chinese tea-trade, but she was an old-fashioned, heavy-bowed, broad-beamed craft, and the new clippers had cut her out.
The good ships Law and Equity, those teak-built, copper-bottomed, iron- fastened, brazen-faced, and not by any means fast-sailing clippers are laid up in ordinary.
Especially was this the case in the days when the wooden clippers did finely to land you in Sydney or in Melbourne under the four full months.
I never saw your equal, and I've met with some clippers in my time too.