clitic

(redirected from cliticise)
Related to cliticise: criticise

clit·ic

 (klĭt′ĭk)
n.
An unstressed word, typically a function word, that is incapable of standing on its own and attaches in pronunciation to a stressed word, with which it forms a single accentual unit. Examples of clitics are the pronoun 'em in I see 'em and the definite article in French l'arme, "the arm."
adj.
Of or relating to a clitic or clisis.

[Greek klitikos, leaning, from klīnein, to lean; see klei- in Indo-European roots.]

clit′i·cize (-sĭz′) v.
clit′i·ci·za′tion (-sĭ-zā′shən) n.

clitic

(ˈklɪtɪk)
adj
(Linguistics) (of a word) incapable of being stressed, usually pronounced as if part of the word that follows or precedes it: for example, in French, me, te, and le are clitic pronouns. See also proclitic, enclitic
n
(Linguistics) a clitic word
[C20: back formation from enclitic and proclitic]

clit•ic

(ˈklɪt ɪk)
adj., n.
enclitic or proclitic.
[1945–50; by extraction]
Translations
EnklitikonKlitikon
clitique
References in periodicals archive ?
What seems to be involved in vicarious specification is at least in part a manifestation of the results of a diachronic tendency for (particularly verbal) predicators to attract to themselves "light" elements which may cliticise or indeed morphologise: elements associated with the dynamic character of verbal predicators (tense, aspect, stativity), with their "mode of existence" (modality, negation), with the status of their arguments (transitivity, voice) or the character of their arguments (concord): cf.