clod


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clod

 (klŏd)
n.
1. A lump or chunk, especially of earth or clay.
2. Earth or soil.
3. A dull, stupid person; a dolt.

[Middle English, variant of clot, lump; see clot.]

clod′dish adj.
clod′dish·ly adv.

clod

(klɒd)
n
1. a lump of earth or clay
2. earth, esp when heavy or in hard lumps
3. Also called: clodpole, clod poll or clodpate a dull or stupid person
4. (Cookery) a cut of beef taken from the shoulder
[Old English clod- (occurring in compound words) lump; related to cloud]
ˈcloddy adj
ˈcloddish adj
ˈcloddishly adv
ˈcloddishness n

clod

(klɒd)

n.
1. a lump or mass, esp. of earth or clay.
2. a stupid person; dolt.
3. earth; soil.
[1400–50; late Middle English clodde, Old English clod- (in clodhamer fieldfare)]
clod′dish, adj.
clod′dish•ness, n.

Clod

 a mass or lump of any solid matter.
Example: clod of earth, clay, iron, brass, turf.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.clod - a compact massclod - a compact mass; "a ball of mud caught him on the shoulder"
clot, coagulum - a lump of material formed from the content of a liquid
agglomeration - a jumbled collection or mass
gob - a lump of slimy stuff; "a gob of phlegm"
clew - a ball of yarn or cord or thread
2.clod - an awkward stupid personclod - an awkward stupid person    
clumsy person - a person with poor motor coordination

clod

noun lump, piece, block, mass, chunk, clump, hunk a clod of earth from which a mass of thick plant roots protruded

clod

noun
1. An irregularly shaped mass of indefinite size:
Informal: hunk.
2. A mentally dull person:
Translations
كُتْلَه من الطّين
hrouda
klump
rög
köggull
grumstas
kukurzniszemes pika
kesektopak

clod

[klɒd] N
1. [of earth] → terrón m
2. (= person) → patán m, zoquete mf
you clod!¡bestia!

clod

[ˈklɒd] n
a clod of earth → une motte de terre

clod

n
(of earth)Klumpen m
(fig: = person, also clodpole) → Trottel m; this silly great cloddieser Obertrottel (inf)

clod

[klɒd] nzolla

clod

(klod) noun
a thick lump, especially of earth.
References in classic literature ?
To learn and discern of his brother the clod, Of his brother the brute, and his brother the God.
Both the god and the clod schools erred, in Martin's estimation, and erred through too great singleness of sight and purpose.
So the man took off his hat, and put him down on a clod of earth, in a ploughed field by the side of the road.
It was as if a clumsy clod had trod upon his toe and he conceived it to be his privilege, his duty, to use deep, resentful oaths.
Man early invented God, often of stone, or clod, or fire, and placed him in trees and mountains and among the stars.
They begin by clodding him; and they laugh themselves to pieces to see him try to dodge one clod and get hit with another?
It is vastly wonderful for so stupid a clod to bestride the shoulders of time and ride the eternities.
I was aroused by a clod of earth striking at my feet.
To crawl is piggish; but to not crawl, to be as the clod and rock, is loathsome to contemplate.
In his grasp the veriest clod of earth assumed a soul.
Poised in her right hand was a third clod, which, seeing that there was now no need for its services, she allowed to fall to the ground.
Like the earth they master and serve, those men, slow of eye and speech, do not show the inner fire; so that, at last, it becomes a question with them as with the earth, what there is in the core: heat, violence, a force mysterious and terrible--or nothing but a clod, a mass fertile and inert, cold and unfeeling, ready to bear a crop of plants that sustain life or give death.