cloistered


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

clois·ter

 (kloi′stər)
n.
1.
a. A quadrangle enclosed by an open colonnade and a covered walk.
b. The covered walk enclosing such a quadrangle.
2.
a. A place, especially a monastery or convent, devoted to religious seclusion.
b. Life in a monastery or convent.
3. A secluded, quiet place.
tr.v. clois·tered, clois·ter·ing, clois·ters
1. To shut away from the world in or as if in a cloister; seclude.
2. To furnish (a building) with a cloister.

[Middle English cloistre, from Old French, alteration (influenced by cloison, partition) of clostre, from Latin claustrum, enclosed place, from claudere, to close.]

cloistered

(ˈklɔɪstəd)
adj
1. secluded or shut up from the world
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) living in a monastery or nunnery
3. (Architecture) (of a building, courtyard, etc) having or provided with a cloister

clois•tered

(ˈklɔɪ stərd)

adj.
1. secluded from the world; sheltered.
2. having a cloister.
[1575–85]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.cloistered - of communal life sequestered from the world under religious vowscloistered - of communal life sequestered from the world under religious vows
unworldly - not concerned with the temporal world or swayed by mundane considerations; "was unworldly and did not greatly miss worldly rewards"- Sheldon Cheney
2.cloistered - providing privacy or seclusion; "the cloistered academic world of books"; "sat close together in the sequestered pergola"; "sitting under the reclusive calm of a shade tree"; "a secluded romantic spot"
private - confined to particular persons or groups or providing privacy; "a private place"; "private discussions"; "private lessons"; "a private club"; "a private secretary"; "private property"; "the former President is now a private citizen"; "public figures struggle to maintain a private life"

cloistered

adjective sheltered, protected, restricted, shielded, confined, insulated, secluded, reclusive, shut off, sequestered, withdrawn, cloistral She was stifled by the cloistered life imposed on women at that time.
public, social, outgoing, gregarious
Translations

cloistered

[ˈklɔɪstəd] ADJ to lead a cloistered lifellevar una vida de ermitaño

cloistered

[ˈklɔɪstərd] adj [world, existence] (= sheltered) → protégé(e)

cloistered

adj
(fig)weltabgeschieden; way of thinkingweltfremd or -fern (liter); to lead a cloistered life (= isolated)in klösterlicher Abgeschiedenheit leben; (= sheltered)ein streng or klösterlich behütetes Leben führen
(Archit) a cloistered courtyardein Klosterhof mmit Kreuzgang

cloistered

[ˈklɔɪstəd] adj (life) → da recluso/a
References in classic literature ?
While still a child, his father had cloistered him in the college of Torchi in the University.
Separated since infancy from his parents, whom he had hardly known; cloistered and immured, as it were, in his books; eager above all things to study and to learn; exclusively attentive up to that time, to his intelligence which broadened in science, to his imagination, which expanded in letters,--the poor scholar had not yet had time to feel the place of his heart.
Beyond this court, let there be an inward court, of the same square and height; which is to be environed with the garden on all sides; and in the inside, cloistered on all sides, upon decent and beautiful arches, as high as the first story.
And could they, remembering how her young heart had sickened at the thought of cloistered walls, look upon her grave, in garbs which would chill the very ashes within it?
When the shepherds came, did Mary imagine how many mysteries the silence of her cloistered heart would one day contain?
Dedicated to God: An Oral History of Cloistered Nuns.
With the traditional cloistered courtyard as his point of departure, Thibault subtly reinterprets this powerful historical archetype through considerations of light, space, materiality and the relationship of the complex to its wider surroundings.
Some of the most celebrated authors of the period were cloistered nuns: St.
The cloistered portion of a monastery usually contained four buildings (church, refectory, dormitory and chapter house), which were linked by open hallways or passageways that were set up in a square or rectangle.
Wealthy families were inclined to protect their investment in costly dowries for their daughters who entered such houses through irrevocable vows and a cloistered life.
Under the archway there is a "no entry" sign, with a tantalising glimpse along a long cloistered passageway.
She chose to make the sisters in the play a cloistered monastery of Poor Clares, a branch of Franciscans known for their vows of poverty.