cloistral


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clois·tral

 (kloi′strəl) also claus·tral (klô′strəl)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or suggesting a cloister; secluded.
2. Living in a cloister.

cloistral

(ˈklɔɪstrəl) or

claustral

adj
(Ecclesiastical Terms) of, like, or characteristic of a cloister

clois•tral

(ˈklɔɪ strəl)

adj.
1. of, pertaining to, or living in a cloister.
2. resembling a cloister; cloisterlike.
[1595–1605]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.cloistral - of communal life sequestered from the world under religious vowscloistral - of communal life sequestered from the world under religious vows
unworldly - not concerned with the temporal world or swayed by mundane considerations; "was unworldly and did not greatly miss worldly rewards"- Sheldon Cheney
References in classic literature ?
The lane was a very cloistral one, with a ribbon of gravelly road, bordered on each side with a rich margin of turf and a scramble of blackberry bushes, green turf banks and dwarf oak-trees making a rich and plenteous shade.
Irony is written all over the cloistral pages of the play.
Diderot scholars have been careful in pointing out that Diderot's The Nun must not be read as a general critique of religion or, more specifically, Christian religion, but rather as a specific critique of cloistral life.
Himself alone Could thus have dared the grave to agitate And claim, among the dead, this awful crown; Nor doubt that He marked also for his own Close to these cloistral steps a burial-place, That every foot might fall with heavier tread, Trampling upon his vileness.
Places (topoi) will be identified and defined in relation to major myths of mankind: the earthly paradise ("heaven on earth"), hell ("valley of weeping"), maternal area, utopias, idyllic space ("medelenism"), secured space, cloistral space (prison), public/private space ("my inner forum" in Marin Preda), etc.
In her three cloistral works Tarabotti drew on the Commedia as a canonical authority, through quotation and literary allusion, to shape her authorial personae and create her own position of authority to write.