cloning


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Related to cloning: Human cloning

clone

 (klōn)
n.
1. A group of cells or organisms that are descended from and genetically identical to a single progenitor, such as a bacterial colony whose members arose from a single original cell.
2. An organism developed asexually from another and genetically identical to it, such as an animal produced from an egg cell into which the nucleus of an adult individual has been transferred.
3. A DNA sequence, such as a gene, that is transferred from one organism to another and replicated by genetic engineering techniques.
4. One that copies or closely resembles another, as in appearance or function: "filled with business-school clones in gray and blue suits" (Michael M. Thomas).
v. cloned, clon·ing, clones
v.tr.
1. To make multiple identical copies of (a DNA sequence).
2. To create or propagate (an organism) from a clone cell: clone a sheep.
3. To reproduce or propagate asexually: clone a plant variety.
4. To produce a copy of; imitate closely: "The look has been cloned into cliché" (Cathleen McGuigan).
v.intr.
To grow as a clone.

[Greek klōn, twig.]

clon′al (klō′nəl) adj.
clon′al·ly adv.
clon′er n.

cloning

(ˈkləʊnɪŋ)
n
(Genetics) genetics the process of making an identical copy of an organism or cell
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cloning - a general term for the research activity that creates a copy of some biological entity (a gene or organism or cell)cloning - a general term for the research activity that creates a copy of some biological entity (a gene or organism or cell)
biological research - scientific research conducted by biologists
reproductive cloning - making a full living copy of an organism; requires a surrogate mother
biomedical cloning, therapeutic cloning - nuclear transplantation of a patient's own cells to make an oocyte from which immune-compatible cells (especially stem cells) can be derived for transplant
Translations
اسْتِنْساخ
genetické klonování
kloning
klónozás
klonlama

cloning

[ˈkləʊnɪŋ] Nclonación f, clonaje m

cloning

nKlonen nt; human cloningKlonen ntvon Menschen; therapeutic cloningtherapeutisches Klonen

clone

(kləun) verb
to produce a copy of an animal or plant from a single cell of that animal or plant.
noun
a copy of an animal or plant produced from that animal or plant.
cloning noun
genetic cloning.

clon·ing

n. clonación; proceso asexual de producción en un embrión.
References in periodicals archive ?
Her call echoed a European Parliament vote for a ban in July, but Tory MEP Struan Stevenson warned that could trigger a trade war with meat exporters to Europe from where cloning is allowed, such as America.
American scientists have been cloning deceased cattle for some time and are believed to be far ahead of British markets in resurrection technologies.
Emma Hockridge, the Soil Association's head of policy, There are no insists industry said cloning raised worrying issues about animal welfare, ethics, public safety, reducing genetic diversity within agriculture and the spread of animal diseases.
Debates about cloning conjure up images of designer babies or a frightening future populated by people who are the exact replica of each other.
The assessment was peer-reviewed by a group of independent scientific experts in cloning and animal health.
To examine how a cell's maturity affects its usefulness for cloning, Xiangzhong (Jerry) Yang of the University of Connecticut in Storrs and his colleagues worked with three types of blood cells from a mouse: stem cells that produce all types of blood cells, more-mature cells that can make only a few blood cell types, and fully mature white blood cells called granulocytes that can no longer divide.
Featuring more than 20 actors, original sound effects, a full orchestral score, and a total running time of two hours on two CDs, Anne Manx On Amazonia from Radio Repertory Company Of America starring Claudia Christian, Barbara Harris, and Patricia Tallman is an superbly recorded science fiction story involving Anne Manx, a private investigator hired in aide of a clone of Amazonia's queen in an attempt to attain perfection after a previous faulty cloning attempt (cloning being the means by which the succession to the throne of Amazonia is accomplished).
Hwang, the lead researcher, claims to oppose the idea of cloning to reproduce a human being because it is "unethical".
Some scientists and their political allies support human cloning for research purposes (which they call "therapeutic" cloning, although it has not produced any therapies).
1998 - The Food and Drug Administration announced it had the authority to regulate human cloning.
In September 2004 President Bush strongly endorsed a United Nations resolution, proposed by Costa Rica, for a global treaty that would completely ban both reproductive cloning/that is, cloning to produce a baby) and therapeutic cloning.