close out


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Related to close out: close off

close

 (klōs)
adj. clos·er, clos·est
1. Being near in space or time. See Usage Note at redundancy.
2. Being near in relationship: close relatives.
3. Bound by mutual interests, loyalties, or affections; intimate: close friends.
4. Having little or no space between elements or parts; tight and compact: a close weave.
5. Being near the surface; short: a close haircut.
6. Being on the brink of: close to tears.
7. Decided by a narrow margin; almost even: a close election.
8. Faithful to the original: a close copy.
9. Very attentive; rigorous; thorough: a close reading; close supervision.
10. Shut; closed.
11. Shut in; enclosed.
12. Confining or narrow; crowded: close quarters.
13. Fitting tightly: close garments.
14. Warm and humid or stuffy: close weather; a close room.
15. Confined to specific persons or groups: a close secret.
16. Strictly confined or guarded: kept under close custody.
17. Secretive; reticent: was close about her personal life.
18. Giving or spending with reluctance; stingy: He is known to be close with his money.
19. Not easily acquired; scarce: Money was close.
20. Linguistics Pronounced with the tongue near the palate, as the ee in meet. Used of vowels.
21. Marked by more rather than less punctuation, especially commas.
v. (klōz) closed, clos·ing, clos·es
v.tr.
1. To move (a door, for example) so that an opening or passage is covered or obstructed; shut.
2. To bar access to: closed the road for repairs.
3. To fill or stop up: closed the cracks with plaster.
4. To stop the operations of permanently or temporarily: closed down the factory.
5. To make unavailable for use: closed the area to development; closed the database to further changes.
6. To bring to an end; terminate: close a letter; close a bank account.
7. To bring together all the elements or parts of: Management closed ranks and ostracized the troublemaker.
8. To join or unite; bring into contact: close a circuit.
9. To draw or bind together the edges of: close a wound.
10. Sports To modify (one's stance), as in baseball or golf, by turning the body so that the forward shoulder and foot are closer to the intended point of impact with the ball.
11. To complete the final details or negotiations on: close a deal.
12. Archaic To enclose on all sides.
v.intr.
1. To become shut: The door closed quietly.
2. To come to an end; finish: The book closes on a hopeful note.
3. To reach an agreement; come to terms: We close on the house next week.
4. To cease operation: The shop closes at six.
5. To be priced or listed at a specified amount when trading ends: Stocks closed higher on Monday.
6.
a. To engage at close quarters: closed with the enemy.
b. To draw near: The orbiter closed with the space station in preparation for docking.
7. To come together: My arms closed around the little child.
8. Baseball To finish a game by protecting a lead. Used of relief pitchers.
n. (klōz)
1. The act of closing.
2. A conclusion; a finish: The meeting came to a close.
3. Music The concluding part of a phrase or theme; a cadence.
4. (klōs) An enclosed place, especially land surrounding or beside a cathedral or other building.
5. (klōs) Chiefly British A narrow way or alley.
6. Archaic A fight at close quarters.
adv. (klōs) closer, closest
In a close position or manner; closely: stayed close together.
Phrasal Verbs:
close in
1. To seem to be gathering in on all sides: The problems closed in.
2. To advance on a target so as to block escape: The police closed in on the sniper.
3. To surround so as to make unusable: The airport was closed in by fog.
close out
1. To dispose of (a line of merchandise) at reduced prices.
2. To terminate, as by selling: close out a business.
Idioms:
close the book on
To make a final effort regarding (something); bring to a conclusion: closed the book on her career with a fine performance.
close to home/the bone
So as to affect one's feelings or interests: Her comment hit close to home.
close to the wind Nautical
At a close angle into the direction from which the wind is blowing: sailing close to the wind.

[Middle English clos, closed, from Old French, from Latin clausus, past participle of claudere, to close. V., from Middle English closen, from Old French clore, clos-, from Latin claudere.]

clos′a·ble, close′a·ble (klō′zə-bəl) adj.
close′ly adv.
close′ness n.
clos′ing (klō′zĭng) n.
Synonyms: close, immediate, near, proximate
These adjectives mean not far from another in space, time, or relationship: an airport close to town; her immediate family; his nearest relative; the proximate neighborhood. See Also Synonyms at complete.
Antonym: far

close out

(kləʊz)
vb
(Accounting & Book-keeping) (adverb) to terminate (a client's or other account) on which the margin is inadequate or exhausted, usually by sale of securities to realize cash
n
the termination of an account on which the margin is exhausted
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.close out - make impossible, especially beforehand
obviate, rid of, eliminate - do away with
2.close out - terminate by selling off or disposing of; "He closed out his line of sports cars"
chuck out, discard, cast aside, cast away, throw away, toss away, toss out, put away, throw out, cast out, dispose, fling, toss - throw or cast away; "Put away your worries"
3.close out - terminate; "We closed out our account"
terminate, end - bring to an end or halt; "She ended their friendship when she found out that he had once been convicted of a crime"; "The attack on Poland terminated the relatively peaceful period after WW I"

close

adjective
1. Not far from another in space, time, or relation:
2. Very closely associated:
Informal: thick.
Slang: tight.
Idiom: hand in glove with.
3. Having all parts near to each other:
4. Nearly equivalent or even:
5. Not deviating from correctness, accuracy, or completeness:
6. Affording little room for movement:
7. Oppressive due to a lack of fresh air:
verb
1. To move (a door, for example) in order to cover an opening:
2. To plug up something, as a hole, space, or container:
3. To bring or come to a natural or proper end:
4. To come together:
phrasal verb
close in
To surround and advance upon:
phrasal verb
close off
To set apart from a group:
phrasal verb
close out
To get rid of completely by selling, especially in quantity or at a discount:
noun
3. An area partially or entirely enclosed by walls or buildings:
adverb
To a point near in time, space, or relation:
References in periodicals archive ?
The Purchased Ounces will be applied to close out contracts for the delivery by Cambior of an equal number of ounces under its current hedging portfolio.
Our market consists of a variety of demographics including businesses wanting to liquidate close outs or excess inventory, antique dealers wanting to showcase an item to a world wide audience, baby boomers downsizing, executors of estates, and all of those individuals selling everything that you can imagine.