clown


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clown

 (kloun)
n.
1.
a. A buffoon or jester who entertains by jokes, antics, and tricks in a circus, play, or other presentation.
b. One who jokes and plays tricks.
2. A coarse, rude, vulgar person; a boor.
3. A peasant; a rustic.
intr.v. clowned, clown·ing, clowns
1. To behave like a buffoon or jester.
2. To perform as a buffoon or jester.
3. To krump, especially in clown makeup.

[Of Scandinavian origin (akin to Icelandic klunni, clumsy person) or of Low German origin.]

clown′er n.
clown′ish adj.
clown′ish·ly adv.
clown′ish·ness n.

clown

(klaʊn)
n
1. (Theatre) a comic entertainer, usually grotesquely costumed and made up, appearing in the circus
2. (Theatre) any performer who elicits an amused response
3. someone who plays jokes or tricks
4. a person who acts in a comic or buffoon-like manner
5. a coarse clumsy rude person; boor
6. archaic a countryman or rustic
vb (intr)
7. to perform as a clown
8. to play jokes or tricks
9. to act foolishly
[C16: perhaps of Low German origin; compare Frisian klönne, Icelandic klunni clumsy fellow]
ˈclownery n
ˈclownish adj
ˈclownishly adv
ˈclownishness n

clown

(klaʊn)

n.
1. a comic performer, esp. in a circus, who wears an outlandish costume and makeup and pantomimes common situations in exaggerated fashion, often also juggling, tumbling, etc.
2. a joker or buffoon; jester.
3. a prankster or practical joker.
4. Slang. a boor, oaf, or fool.
5. a peasant; rustic.
v.i.
6. to act like a clown.
[1555–65; earlier cloyne, clowne, perhaps akin to Old Norse klunni boor, dial. Dan klunds, dial. Swedish klunn log]
clown′ish, adj.
clown′ish•ly, adv.
clown′ish•ness, n.

clown


Past participle: clowned
Gerund: clowning

Imperative
clown
clown
Present
I clown
you clown
he/she/it clowns
we clown
you clown
they clown
Preterite
I clowned
you clowned
he/she/it clowned
we clowned
you clowned
they clowned
Present Continuous
I am clowning
you are clowning
he/she/it is clowning
we are clowning
you are clowning
they are clowning
Present Perfect
I have clowned
you have clowned
he/she/it has clowned
we have clowned
you have clowned
they have clowned
Past Continuous
I was clowning
you were clowning
he/she/it was clowning
we were clowning
you were clowning
they were clowning
Past Perfect
I had clowned
you had clowned
he/she/it had clowned
we had clowned
you had clowned
they had clowned
Future
I will clown
you will clown
he/she/it will clown
we will clown
you will clown
they will clown
Future Perfect
I will have clowned
you will have clowned
he/she/it will have clowned
we will have clowned
you will have clowned
they will have clowned
Future Continuous
I will be clowning
you will be clowning
he/she/it will be clowning
we will be clowning
you will be clowning
they will be clowning
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been clowning
you have been clowning
he/she/it has been clowning
we have been clowning
you have been clowning
they have been clowning
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been clowning
you will have been clowning
he/she/it will have been clowning
we will have been clowning
you will have been clowning
they will have been clowning
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been clowning
you had been clowning
he/she/it had been clowning
we had been clowning
you had been clowning
they had been clowning
Conditional
I would clown
you would clown
he/she/it would clown
we would clown
you would clown
they would clown
Past Conditional
I would have clowned
you would have clowned
he/she/it would have clowned
we would have clowned
you would have clowned
they would have clowned
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.clown - a rude or vulgar foolclown - a rude or vulgar fool    
fool, muggins, saphead, tomfool, sap - a person who lacks good judgment
2.clown - a person who amuses others by ridiculous behaviorclown - a person who amuses others by ridiculous behavior
comedian, comic - a professional performer who tells jokes and performs comical acts
harlequin - a clown or buffoon (after the Harlequin character in the commedia dell'arte)
jester, motley fool, fool - a professional clown employed to entertain a king or nobleman in the Middle Ages
whiteface - a clown whose face is covered with white make-up
zany - a buffoon in one of the old comedies; imitates others for ludicrous effect
Verb1.clown - act as or like a clownclown - act as or like a clown    
jest, joke - act in a funny or teasing way

clown

noun
1. comedian, fool, comic, harlequin, joker, jester, prankster, buffoon, pierrot, dolt a classic circus clown with a big red nose and baggy suit
2. fool, dope (informal), jerk (slang, chiefly U.S. & Canad.), idiot, ass, berk (Brit. slang), prat (slang), moron, twit (informal, chiefly Brit.), imbecile (informal), ignoramus, jackass, dolt, blockhead, ninny, putz (U.S. slang), eejit (Scot. & Irish), thicko (Brit. slang), doofus (slang, chiefly U.S.), lamebrain (informal), numbskull or numskull I could do a better job than those clowns in Washington.
verb
1. (usually with around) play the fool, mess about, jest, act the fool, act the goat, play the goat, piss about or around (taboo slang) He clowned a lot and anatagonized his workmates. Stop clowning around and get some work done.

clown

noun
A person whose words or actions provoke or are intended to provoke amusement or laughter:
Informal: card.
verb
Informal. To make jokes; behave playfully.Also used with around:
Informal: fool around, fun.
Translations
مُهَرِّجيُهَرِّج، يَتَصَرَّف كالمُهَرِّجبَهْلول، مُضْحِك
klaunšašekchovat se jako šašekkašpar
klovnnar
klovni
klaun
bohócbohóckodik
fífl, trúîurfíflasttrúîur
ピエロ
어릿광대
juokdariškasjuokus krėstiklounaskomiškaskomiškas žmogus
ākstītiesākstsklauns
klaunrobiť šašoviny
klovn
clownpajas
ตัวตลก
palyaçoşaklabanlık yapmaksoytarısoytarı gibi kimsesululuk etmek
chú hề

clown

[klaʊn]
A. N
1. (in circus) → payaso/a m/f, clown mf
to make a clown of o.shacer el ridículo
2.patán m, zoquete mf
B. VI (also clown about or around) → hacer el payaso
stop clowning!¡déjate de tonterías!

clown

[ˈklaʊn]
n (in circus)clown m
vi (also clown about, clown around) → faire le clown

clown

n (in circus etc) → Clown m; (inf) (= foolish person also)Kasper m, → Hanswurst m; (pej)Idiot m, → Trottel m; to act the clownden Clown or Hanswurst spielen, herumkaspern (inf)
vi (also clown about or around)herumblödeln (inf)or -kaspern (inf)

clown

[klaʊn]
1. n (in circus) → pagliaccio, clown m inv (fam) → buffone m
2. vi (also clown about or around) → fare il buffone or il pagliaccio

clown

(klaun) noun
1. a person who works in a circus, performing funny acts (usually ridiculously dressed).
2. any person who behaves ridiculously.
verb
to behave ridiculously. Stop clowning.
ˈclownish adjective

clown

مُهَرِّج klaun klovn Clown κλόουν payaso klovni clown klaun pagliaccio ピエロ 어릿광대 clown klovn klown palhaço клоун clown ตัวตลก palyaço chú hề 小丑
References in classic literature ?
As the younger ones slipped up to him in his retreat, he kept taking things out of his pockets; penny dolls, a wooden clown, a balloon pig that was inflated by a whistle.
He was worse than the minstrels, worse than the clown in the circus.
and the clown crack- ing jokes behind him; and by and by all hands dropped the reins, and every lady put her knuckles on her hips and every gentleman folded his arms, and then how the horses did lean over and hump themselves
I'm going to be a clown in a circus when I grow up.
Then it flashed on me - 'The clown at my elbow, who is drinking his tea out of a basin and eating his broad with unwashed hands, may be her husband: Heathcliff junior, of course.
For Agatha, prompt to ridicule sentimentality in her companions, and gifted with an infectious spirit of farce, secretly turned for imaginative luxury to visions of despair and death; and often endured the mortification of the successful clown who believes, whilst the public roar with laughter at him, that he was born a tragedian.
In short, I compelled the clown to unbind him, and to swear he would take him with him, and pay him real by real, and perfumed into the bargain.
As he was reflecting in this wise, his eyes fell upon an immense placard which a sort of clown was carrying through the streets.
Indeed, a jolly little clown came walking toward them, and Dorothy could see that in spite of his pretty clothes of red and yellow and green he was completely covered with cracks, running every which way and showing plainly that he had been mended in many places.
The clown had done it, that man of whom he expected things so fair.
Why couldn't we have a proper old English pantomime-- clown, columbine, and so on.
Miss Josephine Sleary, in her celebrated graceful Equestrian Tyrolean Flower Act, was then announced by a new clown (who humorously said Cauliflower Act), and Mr.