clubs


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club

 (klŭb)
n.
1.
a. A stout heavy stick, usually thicker at one end, suitable for use as a weapon; a cudgel.
b. An implement used in some games to drive a ball, especially a stick with a protruding head used in golf.
c. Something resembling a club.
2. Games
a. A black figure shaped like a trefoil or clover leaf on certain playing cards.
b. A playing card with this figure.
c. clubs(used with a sing. or pl. verb) The suit of cards represented by this figure.
3. A group of people organized for a common purpose, especially a group that meets regularly: a garden club.
4. The building, room, or other facility used for the meetings of an organized group.
5. Sports An athletic team or organization.
6. A nightclub.
v. clubbed, club·bing, clubs
v.tr.
1. To strike or beat with a club or similar implement.
2. To use (a firearm) as a club by holding the barrel and hitting with the butt end.
3. To gather or combine (hair, for example) into a clublike mass.
4. To contribute (money or resources) to a joint or common purpose.
v.intr.
1. To join or combine for a common purpose; form a club.
2. To go to or frequent nightclubs: was out all night clubbing.

[Middle English, from Old Norse klubba.]

clubs

(klʌbz)
pl n
(Card Games) the suit of cards marked with the black trefoil symbol
Translations
السِّباتي
kříže
klør
lauf

club

(klab) noun
1. a heavy stick etc used as a weapon.
2. a bat or stick used in certain games (especially golf). Which club will you use?
3. a number of people meeting for study, pleasure, games etc. the local tennis club.
4. the place where these people meet. He goes to the club every Friday.
5. one of the playing-cards of the suit clubs.
verbpast tense, past participle clubbed
to beat or strike with a club. They clubbed him to death.
clubs noun plural
(sometimes treated as noun singular) one of the four card suits which is black and shaped like a clover. the six of clubs.
References in classic literature ?
She knew of none save those to which you subscribe a pittance weekly in anticipation of rainy days, and the London clubs were her scorn.
So well did he cling to the neck of the one man that they dared not strike with their clubs.
In men's clubs such celebrations were, though expiring, less uncommon; but either the natural shyness of the softer sex, or a sarcastic attitude on the part of male relatives, had denuded such women's clubs as remained (if any other did) or this their glory and consummation.
He led the mazurka at the Arkharovs' ball, talked about the war with Field Marshal Kamenski, visited the English Club, and was on intimate terms with a colonel of forty to whom Denisov had introduced
He stood before the lioness, shouting, and in one hand he held a large war- shield, and in the other he grasped a heavy club shod with iron.
During the War of the Rebellion, a new and influential club was established in the city of Baltimore in the State of Maryland.
We must club the seals," I announced, when convinced of my poor marksmanship.
No one doubted but that the meteor was the projectile of the Gun Club.
The first ray of light which illumines the gloom, and converts into a dazzling brilliancy that obscurity in which the earlier history of the public career of the immortal Pickwick would appear to be involved, is derived from the perusal of the following entry in the Transactions of the Pickwick Club, which the editor of these papers feels the highest pleasure in laying before his readers, as a proof of the careful attention, indefatigable assiduity, and nice discrimination, with which his search among the multifarious documents confided to him has been conducted.
Descending to particulars, each member of the club contributed his own little stock of scandal to the memoirs of the Countess.
Your hat, please," the porter said to Levin, who forgot the club rule to leave his hat in the porter's room.
C', for as secret societies were the fashion, it was thought proper to have one, and as all of the girls admired Dickens, they called themselves the Pickwick Club.