clubs


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

club

 (klŭb)
n.
1.
a. A stout heavy stick, usually thicker at one end, suitable for use as a weapon; a cudgel.
b. An implement used in some games to drive a ball, especially a stick with a protruding head used in golf.
c. Something resembling a club.
2. Games
a. A black figure shaped like a trefoil or clover leaf on certain playing cards.
b. A playing card with this figure.
c. clubs(used with a sing. or pl. verb) The suit of cards represented by this figure.
3. A group of people organized for a common purpose, especially a group that meets regularly: a garden club.
4. The building, room, or other facility used for the meetings of an organized group.
5. Sports An athletic team or organization.
6. A nightclub.
v. clubbed, club·bing, clubs
v.tr.
1. To strike or beat with a club or similar implement.
2. To use (a firearm) as a club by holding the barrel and hitting with the butt end.
3. To gather or combine (hair, for example) into a clublike mass.
4. To contribute (money or resources) to a joint or common purpose.
v.intr.
1. To join or combine for a common purpose; form a club.
2. To go to or frequent nightclubs: was out all night clubbing.

[Middle English, from Old Norse klubba.]

clubs

(klʌbz)
pl n
(Card Games) the suit of cards marked with the black trefoil symbol
Translations
السِّباتي
kříže
klør
lauf

club

(klab) noun
1. a heavy stick etc used as a weapon.
2. a bat or stick used in certain games (especially golf). Which club will you use?
3. a number of people meeting for study, pleasure, games etc. the local tennis club.
4. the place where these people meet. He goes to the club every Friday.
5. one of the playing-cards of the suit clubs.
verbpast tense, past participle clubbed
to beat or strike with a club. They clubbed him to death.
clubs noun plural
(sometimes treated as noun singular) one of the four card suits which is black and shaped like a clover. the six of clubs.
References in classic literature ?
The two men had clubs and were striking about in the half darkness, for now the Indians had set several fires aglow.
He was a familiar figure at the race course, the opera, the fashionable clubs.
The squaws seized clubs, axes, or whatever weapon of offense first offered itself to their hands, and rushed eagerly to act their part in the cruel game that was at hand.
The opposite wall of this entry was hung all over with a heathenish array of monstrous clubs and spears.
Here he stayed, breakfastless, for two hours, until the throng was driven away by the clubs of the police.
That he never read the Bible; never went to church; that he jested and made free with any and every thing that came in the way of his wit; that he spent his Sunday evenings at the opera or theatre; that he went to wine parties, and clubs, and suppers, oftener than was at all expedient,--were all things that Tom could see as plainly as anybody, and on which he based a conviction that "Mas'r wasn't a Christian;"--a conviction, however, which he would have been very slow to express to any one else, but on which he founded many prayers, in his own simple fashion, when he was by himself in his little dormitory.
Anon withal came there upon him two great giants, well armed, all save the heads, with two horrible clubs in their hands.
In the confluence of the multitude, several clubs crossed; blows, aimed at me, fell on other sconces.
And when it come to character, warn't it Compeyson as had been to the school, and warn't it his schoolfellows as was in this position and in that, and warn't it him as had been know'd by witnesses in such clubs and societies, and nowt to his disadvantage?
On the contrary, he must attack and fall upon them with a gallant bearing and a fearless heart, and, if possible, vanquish and destroy them, even though they have for armour the shells of a certain fish, that they say are harder than diamonds, and in place of swords wield trenchant blades of Damascus steel, or clubs studded with spikes also of steel, such as I have more than once seen.
I am, sir," said the king, much agitated; "and recently we have had information that the Bonapartist clubs have had meetings in the Rue Saint-Jacques.
The carved and polished mahogany tables were shattered with heavy clubs and hewn to splinters with axes.