clubwoman


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club·wom·an

 (klŭb′wo͝om′ən)
n.
A woman who is a member of a club or clubs, especially one who is active in club life.

clubwoman

(ˈklʌbˌwʊmən)
n, pl -women
a woman who is an enthusiastic member of a club or clubs
References in periodicals archive ?
Washington selected and arranged by clubwoman Victoria Earle Matthews in 1898 and later re-released in 1995 as Black Diamonds: The Wisdom of Booker T.
271) It was not until 1918 when clubwoman Grace Wilson, a probation officer for the Negro Fellowship League and "house mother" for the Industrial School for Girls, became the first black policewoman in both Chicago and in the United States.
A few key studies are Karen Blair, The Clubwoman as Feminist: True Womanhood Redefined, 1868-1914 (New York: Holmes & Meier Publishers, 1980); Sarah Deutsch, Women and the City: Gender, Space, and Power in Boston, 1870-1940 (New York: Oxford University Press, 2000); Gayle Ann Gullett, Becoming Citizens: The Emergence and
However, in the same year, Irene McCoy Gaines, a prominent Chicago clubwoman who had recently been appointed an executive to the ASNLH's national council, blocked the group from obtaining a charter for a chapter.
Clubwoman Rose Wallace was crucial to the creation and operation of Tehachapi and yet often ran afoul of both male politicians and other clubwomen, most notably over the firing of superintendent Florence Monahan in 1939.
Agnes Morely Cleaveland (1874-1958) was a rancher, writer and clubwoman who was born in New Mexico at the height of the range wars.
Finbarr's clubwoman won her previous four awards from midfield and following a positional switch to the half back line, she has again been instrumental in the county's success.
Twenty years later an editorial in the American Jewess, a monthly periodical edited by journalist and clubwoman Rosa Sonneschein, suggested that American Jewish women had, in fact, come to see the WCTU as contrary to their religious and cultural sensibilities.
One clubwoman wrote, "As mothers and sisters, we want to save the young colored girls who are going astray" (Brown, 1920).
When the activist, educator, and clubwoman Mary Church Terrell discussed The Modern Woman in a 1916 lecture in Charleston, her decorous physical persona impressed her audience as much as did her ideas about the role of women to racial service.
Marieke Venk was named clubwoman of the year, and Laura Knox most unlucky player after breaking her wrist only a few games into her return following a neck injury.
He rejects the invitation of a ferocious clubwoman and refuses "to speak on the subject of 'The Hally Vally' (as she put it, confusing Odin's Hall [Valhalla] with the title of a Finnish epic [Kalevala].