clubwoman


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club·wom·an

 (klŭb′wo͝om′ən)
n.
A woman who is a member of a club or clubs, especially one who is active in club life.

clubwoman

(ˈklʌbˌwʊmən)
n, pl -women
a woman who is an enthusiastic member of a club or clubs
References in periodicals archive ?
Clubwoman as Feminist: True, Womanhood Redefined, 1868-1914.
271) It was not until 1918 when clubwoman Grace Wilson, a probation officer for the Negro Fellowship League and "house mother" for the Industrial School for Girls, became the first black policewoman in both Chicago and in the United States.
Washington selected and arranged by clubwoman Victoria Earle Matthews in 1898 and later re-released in 1995 as Black Diamonds: The Wisdom of Booker T.
A Boston clubwoman proposed that Massachusetts enact a law requiring that stenographers be surrounded by wire cages so they could work unmolested by men.
A few key studies are Karen Blair, The Clubwoman as Feminist: True Womanhood Redefined, 1868-1914 (New York: Holmes & Meier Publishers, 1980); Sarah Deutsch, Women and the City: Gender, Space, and Power in Boston, 1870-1940 (New York: Oxford University Press, 2000); Gayle Ann Gullett, Becoming Citizens: The Emergence and
However, in the same year, Irene McCoy Gaines, a prominent Chicago clubwoman who had recently been appointed an executive to the ASNLH's national council, blocked the group from obtaining a charter for a chapter.
Clubwoman Rose Wallace was crucial to the creation and operation of Tehachapi and yet often ran afoul of both male politicians and other clubwomen, most notably over the firing of superintendent Florence Monahan in 1939.
Agnes Morely Cleaveland (1874-1958) was a rancher, writer and clubwoman who was born in New Mexico at the height of the range wars.
Currently she is writing a biography of Jessie Jack Hooper, suffragist, clubwoman, and world peace advocate from Oshkosh, whom she has been bringing to life in impersonations since 2008.
Malcolm refused to have any part in this litigation, the plaintiff being a prominent clubwoman and friend of his wife.
Her series of "Famous Women" biographies in Colored American Magazine demonstrates Hopkins's "solidarity" with this conservative, exclusionary ideology; at the same time, she exposed the black haute bourgeoisie's conspicuous consumption and social condescension in her 1900 novel Contending Forces, whose tedious clubwoman Mrs.
51) Hurst, who campaigned on her clubwoman status, was secretary of the Nevada Equal Franchise Society, president of the Woman Citizens' Club, and a member of Reno's prestigious Twentieth Century Club.