clung


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clung

 (klŭng)
v.
Past tense and past participle of cling.

clung

(klʌŋ)
vb
the past tense and past participle of cling

cling

(klɪŋ)

v. clung, cling•ing,
n. v.i.
1. to adhere closely; stick to: Wet paper clings to glass.
2. to hold tight, as by grasping or embracing; cleave: The child clung to her mother.
3. to remain attached, as to an idea, hope, memory, etc.
4. to cohere.
n.
5. the act of clinging; adherence.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English clingan to stick together, shrink, wither; akin to clench]
cling′er, n.
cling′ing•ly, adv.
References in classic literature ?
They kissed their mother quietly, clung about her tenderly, and tried to wave their hands cheerfully when she drove away.
The tops of the ridges of frozen mud that formed the road began to melt and the mud clung to Elmer's shoes.
As they neared them they saw that in falling the trees had lifted with their roots a large mass of earth and imbedded rocks that had clung to the twisted and gnarled fibers.
Two half-grown boys and a girl stood holding oilcloth bundles, and a little girl clung to her mother's skirts.
Two of them clung about her white skirts, the third she took from its nurse and with a thousand endearments bore it along in her own fond, encircling arms.
The sisters shuddered and clung closer to each other, while Heyward instinctively laid his hand on one of the pistols he had just drawn from their holsters, as he placed himself between his charge and those dense shadows that seemed to draw an impenetrable veil before the bosom of the forest.
From father to son, they clung to the ancestral house with singular tenacity of home attachment.
Outside of the bulwarks their eager crews with one hand clung to the rail, while one foot was expectantly poised on the gunwale.
To escape his terrible flailings, I seized hold of my harpoon-pole sticking in him, and for a moment clung to that like a sucking fish.
They had a hard time on the passage; there was an agent who helped them, but he proved a scoundrel, and got them into a trap with some officials, and cost them a good deal of their precious money, which they clung to with such horrible fear.
It was a sparkling, frosty, starlight night, and the mother wrapped the shawl close round her child, as, perfectly quiet with vague terror, he clung round her neck.
Her gown was of a soft white silky stuff that clung to her round young figure like a fish's skin, and it was rippled over with the gracefulest little fringy films of lace; she had deep, tender eyes, with long, curved lashes; and she had peachy cheeks, and a dimpled chin, and such a dear little rosebud of a mouth; and she was so dovelike, so pure, and so gracious, so sweet and so bewitching.