clunker


Also found in: Idioms, Wikipedia.

clunk·er

 (clŭng′kər)
n. Informal
1. A decrepit machine, especially an old car; a rattletrap.
2. A failure; a flop.

clunker

(ˈklʌŋkə)
n
1. (Mechanical Engineering) chiefly US a dilapidated old car or other machine
2. something that fails: the novel's last line is a clunker.

clunk•er

(ˈklʌŋ kər)

n. Informal.
1. something worthless or inferior.
2. an old, worn-out machine, esp. a car.
[1940–45]
Translations

clunker

[ˈklʌŋkəʳ] N (US) → cacharro m

clunker

n (US pej inf: = car) → Kiste f (pej inf), → Mühle f (pej inf)
References in periodicals archive ?
As the clunker sales reached a fevered pitch, I think it's fair to say that the deals got much stingier.
Wymott ran a clunker when wearing cheekpieces and I hope that won't be repeated.
The average clunker scrapped got 15 mpg, while the average new car purchased achieved 25 mpg, meeting the minimum requirement of a 10 mpg improvement.
If none of the 8,600 Oregon consumers who participated in the clunker program had received credit for the scrap value of their trade-ins, that would have left $1.
Why just replace a clunker when there are so many reasons to hate your car," said Kelly.
Nihat Ergun spoke to reporters in Qatar, where he attended the Turkish Export Products Exhibition, and said, "it would not be a realistic approach to say that the future of Turkish automotive industry could be saved only by clunker incentive.
They'll get the government Clunker voucher, Your Price, and Your Cash then, as the saying goes, laugh all the way to the bank.
If Rent-a-Clunker's very first car actually was a clunker (which, by the way, is North American slang for a dilapidated vehicle), why wasn't I a speck on the horizon in a shiny sedan from Kurt's Rent-a-Car?
And for the environmentalists, the minuscule increase in mpg required to qualify as a clunker replacement is hardly a victory.
SHE HAS NEVER released a clunker of an album since she burst on the scene with Seven Year Ache in 1981.
Being forced to skate this clunker everyday, you're bummin'
He reports, for example, the Stanford researcher who countered the argument that fallout shelters were too expensive by suggesting that low-income families could create instant shelters by buying clunker cars from junkyards and burying them in their backyards--an idea, Rose observes, guaranteed to horrify any parents who had taken long car trips with their kids.