clutch


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Related to clutch: clutch bag

clutch 1

 (klŭch)
v. clutched, clutch·ing, clutch·es
v.tr.
1. To grasp and hold tightly: a child clutching a blanket.
2. To seize; snatch: clutched the banana from my hand.
v.intr.
1. To attempt to grasp or seize: clutch at a life raft.
2. To engage or disengage a motor vehicle's clutch.
n.
1. A hand, claw, talon, or paw in the act of grasping.
2. A tight grasp.
3. often clutches Control or power: caught in the clutches of sin.
4. A device for gripping and holding.
5.
a. Any of various devices for engaging and disengaging two working parts of a shaft or of a shaft and a driving mechanism.
b. The apparatus, such as a lever or pedal, that activates one of these devices.
6. A tense, critical situation: came through in the clutch.
7. A clutch bag.
adj. Informal
1. Being or occurring in a tense or critical situation: won the championship by sinking a clutch putt.
2. Tending to be successful in tense or critical situations: The coach relied on her clutch pitcher.
Idiom:
clutch at straws
To search in desperation for a solution to a difficulty.

[Middle English clucchen, from Old English clyccan.]

clutch 2

 (klŭch)
n.
1. The complete set of eggs produced or incubated at one time.
2. A brood of chickens.
3. A group; a bunch.
tr.v. clutched, clutch·ing, clutch·es
To hatch (chicks).

[Variant of dialectal cletch; akin to Middle English clekken, to hatch, from Old Norse klekja.]

clutch

(klʌtʃ)
vb
1. (tr) to seize with or as if with hands or claws
2. (tr) to grasp or hold firmly
3. (usually foll by: at) to attempt to get hold or possession (of)
n
4. (Mechanical Engineering) a device that enables two revolving shafts to be joined or disconnected as required, esp one that transmits the drive from the engine to the gearbox in a vehicle
5. (Mechanical Engineering) a device for holding fast
6. a firm grasp
7. a hand, claw, or talon in the act of clutching: in the clutches of a bear.
8. (often plural) power or control: in the clutches of the Mafia.
9. (Clothing & Fashion) Also called: clutch bag a handbag without handles
[Old English clyccan; related to Old Frisian kletsie spear, Swedish klyka clasp, fork]

clutch

(klʌtʃ)
n
1. (Zoology) a hatch of eggs laid by a particular bird or laid in a single nest
2. (Agriculture) a brood of chickens
3. informal a group, bunch, or cluster
vb
(Agriculture) (tr) to hatch (chickens)
[C17 (Northern English dialect) cletch, from Old Norse klekja to hatch]

clutch1

(klʌtʃ)

v.t.
1. to seize with or as if with the hands or claws; snatch.
2. to hold tightly.
3. to spellbind; grip a person's interest or emotions.
v.i.
4. to try to seize or grasp (usu. fol. by at): to clutch at a fleeing child.
5. to operate the clutch in a vehicle.
n.
6. the hand, claw, etc., when grasping.
7. Often, clutches. power or control: to fall into the clutches of the enemy.
8. a tight grip or hold.
9. a device for gripping something.
10.
a. a mechanism for engaging or disengaging a shaft that drives a mechanism or is driven by another part.
b. a pedal or other control for operating this.
11. a critical point or moment.
12. a woman's small strapless handbag.
adj.
13. done in a critical situation: a clutch shot that won the game.
14. dependable in crucial situations: a clutch player.
[1175–1225; Middle English clucchen, variant of clicchen, Old English clyccan to clench]

clutch2

(klʌtʃ)

n., v. clutched, clutch•ing. n.
1. a hatch of eggs; the number of eggs produced or incubated at one time.
2. a brood of chickens.
3. a number of similar things or individuals.
v.t.
4. to hatch (chickens).
[1715–25; variant of dial. cletch; akin to Scots cleck to hatch]

Clutch

 a nest of eggs or brood of young. See also brood, cletch, family.
Examples: clutch of chicken; constables [modern]; eggs, 1721; geese, 1885; partridges; squalls, 1825; tempests, 1825.

clutch


Past participle: clutched
Gerund: clutching

Imperative
clutch
clutch
Present
I clutch
you clutch
he/she/it clutches
we clutch
you clutch
they clutch
Preterite
I clutched
you clutched
he/she/it clutched
we clutched
you clutched
they clutched
Present Continuous
I am clutching
you are clutching
he/she/it is clutching
we are clutching
you are clutching
they are clutching
Present Perfect
I have clutched
you have clutched
he/she/it has clutched
we have clutched
you have clutched
they have clutched
Past Continuous
I was clutching
you were clutching
he/she/it was clutching
we were clutching
you were clutching
they were clutching
Past Perfect
I had clutched
you had clutched
he/she/it had clutched
we had clutched
you had clutched
they had clutched
Future
I will clutch
you will clutch
he/she/it will clutch
we will clutch
you will clutch
they will clutch
Future Perfect
I will have clutched
you will have clutched
he/she/it will have clutched
we will have clutched
you will have clutched
they will have clutched
Future Continuous
I will be clutching
you will be clutching
he/she/it will be clutching
we will be clutching
you will be clutching
they will be clutching
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been clutching
you have been clutching
he/she/it has been clutching
we have been clutching
you have been clutching
they have been clutching
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been clutching
you will have been clutching
he/she/it will have been clutching
we will have been clutching
you will have been clutching
they will have been clutching
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been clutching
you had been clutching
he/she/it had been clutching
we had been clutching
you had been clutching
they had been clutching
Conditional
I would clutch
you would clutch
he/she/it would clutch
we would clutch
you would clutch
they would clutch
Past Conditional
I would have clutched
you would have clutched
he/she/it would have clutched
we would have clutched
you would have clutched
they would have clutched
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.clutch - the act of graspingclutch - the act of grasping; "he released his clasp on my arm"; "he has a strong grip for an old man"; "she kept a firm hold on the railing"
choke hold, chokehold - a restraining hold; someone loops the arm around the neck of another person in a tight grip, usually from behind; "he grabbed the woman in a chokehold, demanded her cash and jewelry, and then fled"
embrace, embracement, embracing - the act of clasping another person in the arms (as in greeting or affection)
prehension, taking hold, grasping, seizing - the act of gripping something firmly with the hands (or the tentacles)
wrestling hold - a hold used in the sport of wrestling
2.clutch - a tense critical situation; "he is a good man in the clutch"
temporary state - a state that continues for a limited time
3.clutch - a number of birds hatched at the same time
brood - the young of an animal cared for at one time
4.clutch - a collection of things or persons to be handled togetherclutch - a collection of things or persons to be handled together
aggregation, collection, accumulation, assemblage - several things grouped together or considered as a whole
schmear, schmeer, shmear - (Yiddish) a batch of things that go together; "he bought the whole schmeer"
5.clutch - a woman's strapless purse that is carried in the handclutch - a woman's strapless purse that is carried in the hand
handbag, purse, bag, pocketbook - a container used for carrying money and small personal items or accessories (especially by women); "she reached into her bag and found a comb"
6.clutch - a pedal or lever that engages or disengages a rotating shaft and a driving mechanismclutch - a pedal or lever that engages or disengages a rotating shaft and a driving mechanism; "he smoothely released the clutch with one foot and stepped on the gas with the other"
clutch - a coupling that connects or disconnects driving and driven parts of a driving mechanism; "this year's model has an improved clutch"
foot lever, foot pedal, treadle, pedal - a lever that is operated with the foot
7.clutch - a coupling that connects or disconnects driving and driven parts of a driving mechanism; "this year's model has an improved clutch"
clutch pedal, clutch - a pedal or lever that engages or disengages a rotating shaft and a driving mechanism; "he smoothely released the clutch with one foot and stepped on the gas with the other"
coupler, coupling - a mechanical device that serves to connect the ends of adjacent objects
freewheel - a clutch (as on the rear wheel of a bicycle) that allows wheels to turn freely (as in coasting)
friction clutch - a clutch in which one part turns the other by the friction between them
transmission system, transmission - the gears that transmit power from an automobile engine via the driveshaft to the live axle
Verb1.clutch - take hold of; grab; "The sales clerk quickly seized the money on the counter"; "She clutched her purse"; "The mother seized her child by the arm"; "Birds of prey often seize small mammals"
nab - seize suddenly
rack - seize together, as of parallel ropes of a tackle in order to prevent running through the block
claw - clutch as if in panic; "She clawed the doorknob"
get hold of, take - get into one's hands, take physically; "Take a cookie!"; "Can you take this bag, please"
arrest, collar, cop, nab, nail, apprehend, pick up - take into custody; "the police nabbed the suspected criminals"
capture, catch, get - succeed in catching or seizing, especially after a chase; "We finally got the suspect"; "Did you catch the thief?"
collar - seize by the neck or collar
clasp - grasp firmly; "The child clasped my hands"
grip - hold fast or firmly; "He gripped the steering wheel"
grab - take or grasp suddenly; "She grabbed the child's hand and ran out of the room"
grab, take hold of, catch - take hold of so as to seize or restrain or stop the motion of; "Catch the ball!"; "Grab the elevator door!"
snatch, snatch up, snap - to grasp hastily or eagerly; "Before I could stop him the dog snatched the ham bone"
clench, clinch - hold in a tight grasp; "clench a steering wheel"
grapple, grip - to grip or seize, as in a wrestling match; "the two men grappled with each other for several minutes"
2.clutch - hold firmly, usually with one's hands; "She clutched my arm when she got scared"
hold, take hold - have or hold in one's hands or grip; "Hold this bowl for a moment, please"; "A crazy idea took hold of him"
cuddle, draw close, nestle, nuzzle, snuggle, nest - move or arrange oneself in a comfortable and cozy position; "We cuddled against each other to keep warm"; "The children snuggled into their sleeping bags"
3.clutch - affect; "Fear seized the prisoners"; "The patient was seized with unbearable pains"; "He was seized with a dreadful disease"
overwhelm, sweep over, whelm, overpower, overtake, overcome - overcome, as with emotions or perceptual stimuli

clutch

verb
1. hold, grip, embrace, grasp, cling to, clasp She was clutching a photograph in her hand.
2. seize, catch, grab, grasp, snatch I staggered and had to clutch at a chair for support.
noun
1. group, crowd, bunch, cluster, pack, load, bevy He was surrounded by a clutch of pretty girls.
plural noun
1. power, hands, control, grip, possession, grasp, custody, sway, keeping, claws He escaped his captors' clutches by jumping from a moving vehicle.

clutch 1

verb
1. To take firmly with the hand and maintain a hold on:
2. To get hold of (something moving):
Informal: nab.
Idiom: lay hands on.
noun
1. The act of catching, especially a sudden taking and holding:
2. An act or means of holding something:
Sports: grapple.

clutch 2

noun
A number of individuals making up or considered a unit:
Translations
سيطرة ، (في) مَخالِب الأعْداءقابِض: جِهازُ تَعْشيقِ تُروس الحَرَكَهقَبْضيَتَمَسَّكُ بِ
chytat sechytit sedržetsevřeníspár
grebhage sig fast iholde hårdt på nogeti kløerne påklo
kytkin
u tuđoj vlasti
kuplung
kúplinggreipargrípa í, òrífahalda fast um
クラッチ
클러치
gniaužtaigriebtis už šiaudonusitverti
grābienssagrābtsajūgssatvertturēt cieši satvertu
kløtsjkløtsjpedalkoblingkoblingspedalkoplingspedal
zvierať
oprijemati sestiskatizgrabiti
koppling
การควบคุม
debriyajkontrol eden kuvvetsıkı sıkı tutmakyakalamaya çalışmak
vòng kiểm soát

clutch

1 [klʌtʃ]
A. N
1. (Aut) → embrague m, cloche m (LAm); (= pedal) → (pedal m del) embrague m or cloche m
to let the clutch inembragar
to let the clutch outdesembragar
2. (= grasp) to make a clutch at sthtratar de agarrar algo
to fall into sb's clutchescaer en las garras de algn
to get sth out of sb's clutcheshacer que algn ceda la posesión or se desprenda de algo
3. (US) (= crisis) → crisis f inv
B. VT (= catch hold of) → asir, agarrar (esp LAm); (= hold tightly) → apretar, agarrar
she clutched my arm and begged me not to gose me agarró al brazo y me suplicó que no me marchara
C. VI to clutch attratar de agarrar (fig) → aferrarse a
he clutched at my handtrató de agarrarme la mano
to clutch at a hopeaferrarse a una esperanza
to clutch at strawsaferrarse a cualquier esperanza

clutch

2 [klʌtʃ] N [of eggs] → nidada f

clutch

[ˈklʌtʃ]
n
(= grip, grasp) → étreinte f, prise f
[car] → embrayage m
vt [+ object] → serrer fort
to clutch at sth (for physical support)se cramponner à qch; (fig)sauter sur qchclutch bag npochette fclutch pedal n [car] → pédale f d'embrayage

clutch

1
n
(= grip)Griff m
(Aut) → Kupplung f; to let in/out the clutchein-/auskuppeln; clutch pedalKupplungspedal nt
(fig) to fall into somebody’s clutchesjdm in die Hände fallen, jdm ins Netz gehen; to be in somebody’s clutchesin jds Gewalt (dat)sein; to have somebody in one’s clutchesjdn im Netz or in den Klauen haben; he escaped her clutcheser entkam ihren Klauen
vt (= grab)umklammern, packen; (= hold tightly)umklammert halten; to clutch something in one’s handetw umklammern

clutch

2
n (of chickens)Brut f; (of eggs)Gelege nt

clutch

1 [klʌtʃ]
1. n
a. (Aut) → frizione f; (pedal) → (pedale m della) frizione
b. (grip, grasp) → presa, stretta
to fall into sb's clutches → cadere nelle grinfie di qn
2. vt (catch hold of) → afferrare; (hold tightly) → tenere stretto/a, stringere forte
3. vi to clutch atcercare di afferrare
to clutch at straws (fig) → crearsi delle illusioni

clutch

2 [klʌtʃ] n (of eggs, chickens) → covata

clutch

(klatʃ) verb
1. (with at) to try to take hold of. I clutched at a floating piece of wood to save myself from drowning.
2. to hold tightly (in the hands). She was clutching a 50–cent piece.
noun
1. control or power. He fell into the clutches of the enemy.
2. (the pedal operating) a device by means of which two moving parts of an engine may be connected or disconnected. He released the clutch and the car started to move.
clutch at straws
to hope that something may help one in a hopeless situation.

clutch

قَبْض sevření greb Kupplung συμπλέκτης embrague, garras kytkin embrayage u tuđoj vlasti grinfia クラッチ 클러치 greep kløtsj sprzęgło embraiagem, garras власть внешних обстоятельств koppling การควบคุม debriyaj vòng kiểm soát 陷入某人的控制中
References in classic literature ?
and a clutch at his hair, as became a distracted composer.
A quick impulse that was somewhat spasmodic impelled her fingers to close in a sort of clutch upon his hand.
The pious clergyman surely would not have uttered words like these had he in the least suspected that the Colonel had been thrust into the other world with the clutch of violence upon his throat.
Then, gasping for breath, did Hester Prynne clutch the fatal token, instinctively endeavouring to tear it away, so infinite was the torture inflicted by the intelligent touch of Pearl's baby-hand.
When Bildad was a chief-mate, to have his drab-colored eye intently looking at you, made you feel completely nervous, till you could clutch something --a hammer or a marling-spike, and go to work like mad, at something or other, never mind what.
he intensely whispered, seizing the helm -- gripe your oars, and clutch your souls, now
As he said this, he released me from his clutch, and only looked at me.
Skulker has caught a little girl, sir," he replied; "and there's a lad here," he added, making a clutch at me, "who looks an out-and- outer
Mistress Mary did not mean to put out her hand and clutch his sleeve but she did it.
Cleverly including her master in the conversation, so as to prevent the captain from effecting a diversion in that quarter; sparing no petty aggravation; striking at every tender place which the tongue of a spiteful woman can wound, she would, beyond all doubt, have carried her point, and tortured Magdalen into openly betraying herself, if Captain Wragge had not checked her in full career by a loud exclamation of alarm, and a sudden clutch at Magdalen's wrist.
She was very tired and cold, --so tired she seemed hardly to have the spirit to eat, and evidently the cold had taken tight clutch of her lungs, for she had a cough that went to my heart to hear, and her face was ghastly pale.
what a losing venture is this for one who hath duly kept every jot and tittle of the law of Moses Fifty zecchins wrenched from me at one clutch, and by the talons of a tyrant