co-occur


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co-occur

vb (intr)
to happen at the same time as something else
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.co-occur - go with, fall together
coexist - exist together
overlap - coincide partially or wholly; "Our vacations overlap"
Translations

co-occur

[ˌkəʊəˈkɜːʳ] VIcoocurrir
References in periodicals archive ?
ISLAMABAD -- Being an overachiever may benefit one's in the grander scheme of things but in the work space it is found frequently to co-occur with psychiatric disorders, a study says.
Although conduct disorder and anxiety disorders commonly co-occur with SUD, there has been less research evaluating the impact of pharmacotherapy on treating these disorders.
While these conditions in isolation already provide a challenge for educators, an additional problem is that specific learning disabilities also co-occur for more often that would be expected.
No significant associations were found between race/ethnicity and other problems that commonly co-occur with autism, including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, developmental delays, and depression.
Linking the plant behaviours with their benefits is challenging when multiple processes co-occur," Dudley stated.
Some prior research suggests that risky health behaviors tend to co-occur (i.
Mental health problems in CLTC frequently co-occur with other problems and, according to the theory of competing demands (Klinkman, 1997), must "compete" for attention with other pressing problems.
They conclude that self-injurious behaviour signals an attempt "to cope with psychological distress that may co-occur or lead to suicidal behaviours in individuals experiencing more duress than they can effectively mitigate.
Four of them consist of diverse associations but are dominated by species belonging to a single genus, which co-occur with several subordinate genera and a bunch of rare taxa.
It is hoped that research in this area will have implications for the understanding of ADHD subtype clusters, heterogeneous presentation across gender and age, comorbid conditions, and functional impairments that co-occur with ADHD.
Bipolar disorder is difficult to recognize and diagnose in youth, however, because it does not fit precisely the symptom criteria established for adults, and because its symptoms can resemble or co-occur with those of other common childhood-onset mental disorders.
While this rate of co-occurrence has led some to theorize that the two disorders share overlapping deficits (Marshall & Hynd, 1997), other research concludes that ADD and learning disability are separate and distinct entities that often co-occur (Riccio & Jemison, 1998).