coachman


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coach·man

 (kōch′mən)
n.
1. A man who drives a coach or carriage.
2. An artificial fly used in angling.

coachman

(ˈkəʊtʃmən)
n, pl -men
1. the driver of a coach or carriage
2. (Angling) a fishing fly with white wings and a brown hackle

coach•man

(ˈkoʊtʃ mən)

n., pl. -men.
a man employed to drive a coach or carriage.
[1570–80]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.coachman - a man who drives a coach (or carriage)coachman - a man who drives a coach (or carriage)
driver - someone who drives animals that pull a vehicle
Translations
حوذي، سائِقُ عَرَبَه
kočí
kusk
fogathajtókocsis
ekill
kočiš
arabacı

coachman

[ˈkəʊtʃmən] N (coachmen (pl)) → cochero m

coach

(kəutʃ) noun
1. a railway carriage. The last two coaches of the train were derailed.
2. a bus for tourists etc.
3. a trainer in athletics, sport etc. the tennis coach.
4. a private teacher. They employed a coach to help their son with his mathematics.
5. a four-wheeled horsedrawn vehicle.
verb
to prepare (a person) for an examination, contest etc. He coached his friend for the Latin exam.
ˈcoachbuilder noun
a person or business concerned with building the bodies for modern vehicles.
ˈcoachman noun
the driver of a horsedrawn carriage.
References in classic literature ?
Cornelius and John, after driving along the pond, had taken the main street, which leads to the Tol-Hek, giving directions to the coachman to slacken his pace, in order not to excite any suspicion.
Reins and whip and coachman and guard, however, in combination, had read that article of war which forbade a purpose otherwise strongly in favour of the argument, that some brute animals are endued with Reason; and the team had capitulated and returned to their duty.
The coachman catches his whip into a double thong, and throws it to the hostler; the steam of the horses rises straight up into the air.
And approaching the carriage, he examined the arms on the panels and the livery of the coachman on his box.
Weller disappear for five minutes, most probably to get the hot brandy-and-water, for they smell very strongly of it, when they return, the coachman mounts to the box, Mr.
The burly old coachman from Oakbourne, seeing such a pretty young woman among the outside passengers, had invited her to come and sit beside him; and feeling that it became him as a man and a coachman to open the dialogue with a joke, he applied himself as soon as they were off the stones to the elaboration of one suitable in all respects.
It was drawn by one hundred pairs of white mice, and the Poodle sat on the coachman's seat and snapped his whip gayly in the air, as if he were a real coachman in a hurry to get to his destination.
It was now past five in the morning, and other company began to rise and come to the kitchen, among whom were the serjeant and the coachman, who, being thoroughly reconciled, made a libation, or, in the English phrase, drank a hearty cup together.
he said to him dryly, and calling the coachman, he began pulling the horses out.
The coachman, too, with the blood still streaming from his nose, tugged and toiled most manfully, dreading, doubtless, that the next blow might break his head.
While the present century was in its teens, and on one sunshiny morning in June, there drove up to the great iron gate of Miss Pinkerton's academy for young ladies, on Chiswick Mall, a large family coach, with two fat horses in blazing harness, driven by a fat coachman in a three-cornered hat and wig, at the rate of four miles an hour.
The name of the coachman was John Manly; he had a wife and one little child, and they lived in the coachman's cottage, very near the stables.