coalman


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coalman

(ˈkəʊlmæn)
n, pl -men
a person who sells or delivers coal
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.coalman - someone who delivers coal
delivery boy, deliveryman, deliverer - someone employed to make deliveries
Translations

coalman

[ˈkəʊlmən] N (coalmen (pl)) → carbonero m

coalman

[ˈkəʊlmæn] ncharbonnier m, marchand m de charboncoal mine nmine f de charboncoal miner nmineur mcoal mining nextraction f du charboncoal scuttle n (mainly British)seau m à charboncoal tar coal-tar
ncoaltar m
modif [dye] → au coaltar; [waste] → de coaltar

coalman

[ˈkəʊlˌmæn] n (-men (pl)) → carbonaio
References in periodicals archive ?
A This is a throwback to the days when the coalman delivered to properties along shared pathways.
He was the fifth of 16 children born to a coalman, and he shared a bedroom in the end-terrace house with three brothers.
My father was a coalman and we delivered coke for the boilers for many years.
LAST summer, 21-year-old coalman Vince Peart set up a website to tempt women to move to the remote Cumbrian village of Alston.
I remember Ernie Boston the lamplighter, Darkie Earl the local bobby and Jack Robbins the coalman
Twenty years ago this garden was a bramble-strewn field and Lee, with the help of Clarry Groom, a coalman with a flair for horticulture, has produced a remarkable transformation.
The tradition springs out of the Hutsby clan's love affair with the Foxhunter, which began when grandfather Henry rode St Coalman to victory almost 60 years ago and continued with father Ken failing honourably in his attempts to win the race.
06 (480m): Blackhouse Bella, Romeo Big Fun, Midweek Mayhem, Target Coalman, Fabulous Storm, Risky Hibby (W).
In those early days, traders regularly plied their wares from street to street, with regular visitors such as coalman John Thompson, and Bob Durham initially selling fruit and later trading in coal.
On Saturday, October 30 1965, at 5pm, 24-year-old coalman Carl Woodbridge sat at the family table at his terraced home in Kensington and watched the telly as he had his tea.
In order to keep it open for the benefit of the coalman and the milkman - if the bad weather went on too long - all the men and able-bodied youths would turn out on the Saturday and clear the roads themselves.
Former boxer and coalman Wray was one of a family of nine born in a slum in Glasgow's Gorbals.