coarse

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Related to coarser: erroneously, irreparably

coarse

 (kôrs)
adj. coars·er, coars·est
1. Of low, common, or inferior quality.
2.
a. Lacking in delicacy or refinement: coarse manners.
b. Vulgar or indecent: coarse language.
3. Consisting of large particles; not fine in texture: coarse sand.
4. Rough, especially to the touch: a coarse tweed.

[Middle English cors, probably from course, custom; see course.]

coarse′ly adv.
coarse′ness n.

coarse

(kɔːs)
adj
1. rough in texture, structure, etc; not fine: coarse sand.
2. lacking refinement or taste; indelicate; vulgar: coarse jokes.
3. of inferior quality; not pure or choice
4. (Metallurgy) (of a metal) not refined
5. (Mechanical Engineering) (of a screw) having widely spaced threads
[C14: of unknown origin]
ˈcoarsely adv
ˈcoarseness n

coarse

(kɔrs, koʊrs)

adj. coars•er, coars•est.
1. composed of relatively large parts or particles: coarse sand.
2. lacking in fineness or delicacy of texture, structure, etc.: coarse fabric.
3. harsh; grating.
4. lacking refinement; unpolished: coarse manners.
5. vulgar; obscene: coarse language.
6. (of metals) unrefined.
7. (of a metal file) having the maximum commercial grade of coarseness.
[1550–60; earlier cors(e), course, cowarce]
coarse′ly, adv.
coarse′ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.coarse - of textures that are rough to the touch or substances consisting of relatively large particles; "coarse meal"; "coarse sand"; "a coarse weave"
rough, unsmooth - having or caused by an irregular surface; "trees with rough bark"; "rough ground"; "rough skin"; "rough blankets"; "his unsmooth face"
fine - of textures that are smooth to the touch or substances consisting of relatively small particles; "wood with a fine grain"; "fine powdery snow"; "fine rain"; "batiste is a cotton fabric with a fine weave"; "covered with a fine film of dust"
2.coarse - lacking refinement or cultivation or tastecoarse - lacking refinement or cultivation or taste; "he had coarse manners but a first-rate mind"; "behavior that branded him as common"; "an untutored and uncouth human being"; "an uncouth soldier--a real tough guy"; "appealing to the vulgar taste for violence"; "the vulgar display of the newly rich"
unrefined - (used of persons and their behavior) not refined; uncouth; "how can a refined girl be drawn to such an unrefined man?"
3.coarse - of low or inferior quality or value; "of what coarse metal ye are molded"- Shakespeare; "produced...the common cloths used by the poorer population"
inferior - of low or inferior quality

coarse

adjective
1. rough, crude, unfinished, homespun, impure, unrefined, rough-hewn, unprocessed, unpolished, coarse-grained, unpurified He wore a shepherd's tunic of coarse cloth. a tablespoon of coarse sea salt
rough soft, polished, smooth, refined, purified, fine-grained
2. vulgar, offensive, rude, indecent, improper, raunchy (slang), earthy, foul-mouthed, bawdy, impure, smutty, impolite, ribald, immodest, indelicate He has a very coarse sense of humour.
3. loutish, rough, brutish, boorish, uncivil They don't know how to behave, and are coarse and insulting.
loutish fine, cultured, polished, sophisticated, proper, pleasant, refined, polite, civilized, genteel, urbane, well-bred, inoffensive, well-mannered

coarse

adjective
2. Offensive to accepted standards of decency:
Slang: raunchy.
3. Consisting of or covered with large particles:
4. Having a surface that is not smooth:
Translations
خَشِن، فَظ، بَذيءسَميكفَظّ
hrubýsprostýsurovýdrsný
grov
karkea
גסגסהנחותה
grub
durva
grófurklúr; ruddalegur
きめの粗い粗い
거친
grubiaigrubumaspadaryti grubųpadaryti šiurkštųpasidaryti grubiam
neapstrādātspiedauzīgsraupjšrupjšvulgārs
grosiergrosiera
grobraskav
grov
อย่างหยาบ
kabaterbiyesiz
thô

coarse

[kɔːs]
A. ADJ (coarser (compar) (coarsest (superl)))
1. (= rough) [texture] → basto, áspero; [sand] → grueso; [skin] → áspero
2. (= badly made) → burdo, tosco
3. (= vulgar) [character, laugh, remark] → ordinario, tosco; [joke] → verde
B. CPD coarse fishing Npesca f de agua dulce (excluyendo salmón y trucha)

coarse

[ˈkɔːrs] adj
(= not fine) [cloth] → grossier/ière; [skin] → épais(se); [hair] → dru(e); [sand, salt] → gros(se); [grass] → dru(e)
The bag was made of coarse cloth → Le sac était fait d'un tissu grossier.
[language, remark] → grossier/ière
coarse language → langage m grossier
[person] (= vulgar) → vulgairecoarse fishing npêche f à la ligne

coarse

adj (+er)
(= not delicate, in texture) → grob; sand, sugar alsogrobkörnig; features alsoderb; coarse sandpapergrobes Schmirgelpapier
(= uncouth)gewöhnlich; person, manners alsogrob, ungehobelt, ungeschliffen; laughderb; jokederb, unanständig
(= common) foodderb, einfach; coarse red wineeinfacher (Land)rotwein

coarse

:
coarse fish
nSüßwasserfisch m (mit Ausnahme aller Lachs- und Forellenarten)
coarse fishing
nAngeln ntvon Süßwasserfischen
coarse-grained
adjgrobfaserig; coarse fibregrobe Faser; coarse paperungeleimtes Papier, Zeitungspapier nt

coarse

[kɔːs] adj (-er (comp) (-est (superl))) (texture, skin, material) → ruvido/a; (salt, sand) → grosso/a; (sandpaper) → a grana grossa; (vulgar, character, laugh, remark) → volgare

coarse

(koːs) adjective
1. rough in texture or to touch; not fine. This coat is made of coarse material.
2. rude, vulgar or unrefined. coarse jokes.
ˈcoarsely adverb
ˈcoarseness noun
ˈcoarsen verb
to (cause to) become coarse. The laundry-work coarsened her hands.

coarse

فَظّ hrubý grov grob τραχύς basto, tosco karkea grossier grub grezzo きめの粗い 거친 grof grov szorstki grosseiro грубый grov อย่างหยาบ kaba thô 粗糙的

coarse

a. grueso-a; rudo-a, tosco-a, burdo-a, ordinario-a.
References in classic literature ?
It was followed by a coarser expression; or one that had the effect of coarseness on the fine mould and outline of his countenance, because there was nothing intellectual to temper it.
Morally, as well as materially, there was a coarser fibre in those wives and maidens of old English birth and breeding than in their fair descendants, separated from them by a series of six or seven generations; for, throughout that chain of ancestry, every successive mother had transmitted to her child a fainter bloom, a more delicate and briefer beauty, and a slighter physical frame, if not character of less force and solidity than her own.
She was so eager to have them drawn that I could not refuse; but there is no making children of three or four years old stand still you know; nor can it be very easy to take any likeness of them, beyond the air and complexion, unless they are coarser featured than any of mama's children ever were.
having enough to do in attending to the coarser part of the domestic work) was in no position to disclose the secrets of Miss Bygrave's wardrobe, which were known only to the young lady herself and to her aunt.
Micawber to my aunt, 'if you will allow me, ma'am, to cull a figure of speech from the vocabulary of our coarser national sports - floors me.
Now, I saw the damp lying on the bare hedges and spare grass, like a coarser sort of spiders' webs; hanging itself from twig to twig and blade to blade.
It is true that her light-brown hair was cropped behind like a boy's, and was dressed in front in a number of flat rings, that lay quite away from her face; but there was no sort of coiffure that could make Miss Nancy's cheek and neck look otherwise than pretty; and when at last she stood complete in her silvery twilled silk, her lace tucker, her coral necklace, and coral ear-drops, the Miss Gunns could see nothing to criticise except her hands, which bore the traces of butter-making, cheese-crushing, and even still coarser work.
I was very much tired, and disposed to sleep, which my mistress perceiving, she put me on her own bed, and covered me with a clean white handkerchief, but larger and coarser than the mainsail of a man-of-war.
The Satyr was a gleam of classical memory on the part of Moreau,--his face ovine in expression, like the coarser Hebrew type; his voice a harsh bleat, his nether extremities Satanic.
These were employed in the coarser parts of the work, and particularly in pricking in straight marks.
On her father, her confidence had not been sanguine, but he was more negligent of his family, his habits were worse, and his manners coarser, than she had been prepared for.
But when the ethereal portion of a man of genius is obscured the earthly part assumes an influence the more uncontrollable, because the character is now thrown off the balance to which Providence had so nicely adjusted it, and which, in coarser natures, is adjusted by some other method.