coax


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coax 1

 (kōks)
v. coaxed, coax·ing, coax·es
v.tr.
1. To persuade or try to persuade by pleading or flattery; cajole.
2. To obtain by persistent persuasion: coaxed the secret out of the child.
3. Obsolete To caress; fondle.
4. To move to or adjust toward a desired end: "A far more promising approach to treating advanced melanoma is to coax the immune system to recognize melanoma cells as deadly" (Natalie Angier).
v.intr.
To use persuasion or inducement.

[Obsolete cokes, to fool, from cokes, fool.]

coax′er n.
coax′ing·ly adv.

co·ax 2

 (kō′ăks, kō-ăks′)
n. Informal
A coaxial cable.

coax

(kəʊks)
vb
1. to seek to manipulate or persuade (someone) by tenderness, flattery, pleading, etc
2. (tr) to obtain by persistent coaxing
3. (tr) to work on or tend (something) carefully and patiently so as to make it function as one desires: he coaxed the engine into starting.
4. (tr) obsolete to caress
5. (tr) obsolete to deceive
[C16: verb formed from obsolete noun cokes fool, of unknown origin]
ˈcoaxer n
ˈcoaxingly adv

coax

(ˈkəʊæks)
n
(Electronics) short for coaxial cable

coax1

(koʊks)

v.t.
1. to attempt to influence by gentle persuasion, flattery, etc.; cajole: Maybe you can coax her to sing.
2. to obtain by coaxing: to coax a secret from someone.
3. to maneuver into a desired position or end by adroit and persistent handling: He coaxed the large chair through the door.
4. Obs. to fondle.
v.i.
5. to use gentle persuasion, flattery, etc.
[1580–90; v. use of cokes fool (now obsolete)]
coax′er, n.
coax′ing•ly, adv.

co•ax2

(koʊˈæks, ˈkoʊ æks)

n.
a coaxial cable.
[1945–50; by shortening]

coax


Past participle: coaxed
Gerund: coaxing

Imperative
coax
coax
Present
I coax
you coax
he/she/it coaxes
we coax
you coax
they coax
Preterite
I coaxed
you coaxed
he/she/it coaxed
we coaxed
you coaxed
they coaxed
Present Continuous
I am coaxing
you are coaxing
he/she/it is coaxing
we are coaxing
you are coaxing
they are coaxing
Present Perfect
I have coaxed
you have coaxed
he/she/it has coaxed
we have coaxed
you have coaxed
they have coaxed
Past Continuous
I was coaxing
you were coaxing
he/she/it was coaxing
we were coaxing
you were coaxing
they were coaxing
Past Perfect
I had coaxed
you had coaxed
he/she/it had coaxed
we had coaxed
you had coaxed
they had coaxed
Future
I will coax
you will coax
he/she/it will coax
we will coax
you will coax
they will coax
Future Perfect
I will have coaxed
you will have coaxed
he/she/it will have coaxed
we will have coaxed
you will have coaxed
they will have coaxed
Future Continuous
I will be coaxing
you will be coaxing
he/she/it will be coaxing
we will be coaxing
you will be coaxing
they will be coaxing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been coaxing
you have been coaxing
he/she/it has been coaxing
we have been coaxing
you have been coaxing
they have been coaxing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been coaxing
you will have been coaxing
he/she/it will have been coaxing
we will have been coaxing
you will have been coaxing
they will have been coaxing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been coaxing
you had been coaxing
he/she/it had been coaxing
we had been coaxing
you had been coaxing
they had been coaxing
Conditional
I would coax
you would coax
he/she/it would coax
we would coax
you would coax
they would coax
Past Conditional
I would have coaxed
you would have coaxed
he/she/it would have coaxed
we would have coaxed
you would have coaxed
they would have coaxed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.coax - a transmission line for high-frequency signals
transmission line, cable, line - a conductor for transmitting electrical or optical signals or electric power
ethernet cable - any of several types of coaxial cable used in ethernets
Verb1.coax - influence or urge by gentle urging, caressing, or flattering; "He palavered her into going along"
persuade - cause somebody to adopt a certain position, belief, or course of action; twist somebody's arm; "You can't persuade me to buy this ugly vase!"
soft-soap - persuade someone through flattery
browbeat, bully, swagger - discourage or frighten with threats or a domineering manner; intimidate

coax

verb persuade, cajole, talk into, wheedle, sweet-talk (informal), prevail upon, inveigle, soft-soap (informal), twist (someone's) arm, flatter, entice, beguile, allure After lunch she coaxed him into talking about himself.
force, threaten, bully, intimidate, harass, coerce, pressurize, browbeat

coax

verb
To persuade or try to persuade by gentle persistent urging or flattery:
Informal: soft-soap, sweet-talk.
Translations
يُلاطِف، يَتَمَلَّق، يَسْتَميل
přemluvitvyškemrat
listelokke
koksusovitellaujuttaa
csalogat
lokka; ganga eftir
įkalbintiišvilioti
izvilinātpiedabūtpierunāt
tatlı sözle kandırmak

coax

[kəʊks] VT to coax sth out of sbsonsacar algo a algn (engatusándolo)
to coax sb into/out of doing sthengatusar a algn para que haga/no haga algo
to coax sb alongmimar a algn

coax

[ˈkəʊks] vt
to coax sb into doing sth → amadouer qn pour qu'il fasse qch

coax

vtüberreden; to coax somebody into doing somethingjdn beschwatzen (inf)or dazu bringen, etw zu tun; he coaxed the engine into lifeer brachte den Motor mit List und Tücke in Gang; you have to coax the firedu musst dem Feuer ein bisschen nachhelfen; to coax something out of somebodyjdm etw entlocken

coax

[kəʊks] vt to coax sth out of sbottenere qc da qn (con le buone)
to coax sb into/out of doing sth → convincere or indurre (con moine) qn a fare/non fare qc

coax

(kəuks) verb
to persuade by flattery, by patient and gentle treatment etc. He coaxed her into going to the dance by saying she was the best dancer he knew; He coaxed some money out of his mother.
References in classic literature ?
Amy being gone, Laurie was her only refuge, and much as she enjoyed his society, she rather dreaded him just then, for he was an incorrigible tease, and she feared he would coax the secret from her.
exclaimed Stubb, approvingly, coax 'em to it; try that, and Fleece continued.
why can't you kinder coax 'em up, and speak 'em fair?
The doctors said we must take the child away, if we would coax her back to health and strength again.
Everybody that could get a chance at him tried their best to coax him off of his horse so they could lock him up and get him sober; but it warn't no use -- up the street he would tear again, and give Sherburn another cussing.
From this deficiency of nourishment resulted an abuse, which pressed hardly on the younger pupils: whenever the famished great girls had an opportunity, they would coax or menace the little ones out of their portion.
The little monkey had crept by the skylight of one garret, along the roof, into the skylight of the other, and it was with the utmost difficulty I could coax her out again.
However little there is to eat, he always saves a bit o' his bread to coax his pets.
My little wife came and sat upon my knee, to coax me to be quiet, and drew a line with her pencil down the middle of my nose; but I couldn't dine off that, though it was very agreeable.
and must coax them out of the difficulties they make for themselves by their own ill temper.
She told her how they could get hold of it, and how she was to coax it from him, and at last threatened her angrily, saying,
You speak like a man of sense," said the curate, "and you will be acting like a good Christian; but what must now be done is to take steps to coax your master out of that useless penance you say he is performing; and we had best turn into this inn to consider what plan to adopt, and also to dine, for it is now time.