coaxing


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coax 1

 (kōks)
v. coaxed, coax·ing, coax·es
v.tr.
1. To persuade or try to persuade by pleading or flattery; cajole.
2. To obtain by persistent persuasion: coaxed the secret out of the child.
3. Obsolete To caress; fondle.
4. To move to or adjust toward a desired end: "A far more promising approach to treating advanced melanoma is to coax the immune system to recognize melanoma cells as deadly" (Natalie Angier).
v.intr.
To use persuasion or inducement.

[Obsolete cokes, to fool, from cokes, fool.]

coax′er n.
coax′ing·ly adv.

co·ax 2

 (kō′ăks, kō-ăks′)
n. Informal
A coaxial cable.

coaxing

(ˈkəʊksɪŋ)
n
the act of persuading by tenderness, flattery, pleading, etc
adj
serving to persuade or manipulate
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.coaxing - flattery designed to gain favorcoaxing - flattery designed to gain favor  
flattery - excessive or insincere praise
Adj.1.coaxing - pleasingly persuasive or intended to persuade; "a coaxing and obsequious voice"; "her manner is quiet and ingratiatory and a little too agreeable"
persuasive - intended or having the power to induce action or belief; "persuasive eloquence"; "a most persuasive speaker"; "a persuasive argument"
Translations

coaxing

[ˈkəʊksɪŋ]
A. ADJmimoso
B. Nmimos mpl, halagos mpl

coaxing

ngutes Zureden, Zuspruch m; with a little coaxing the engine/fire startedmit etwas List und Tücke kam der Motor/das Feuer in Gang

coaxing

[ˈkəʊksɪŋ] nmoine fpl
References in classic literature ?
We've got no tea nor butter," said the old woman, with something like a scowl, as if she were getting tired of coaxing.
said Alice, in a coaxing tone, and she tried hard to whistle to it; but she was terribly frightened all the time at the thought that it might be hungry, in which case it would be very likely to eat her up in spite of all her coaxing.
Accordingly we went a-maying, following the lure of dancing winds to a certain westward sloping hill lying under the spirit-like blue of spring skies, feathered over with lisping young pines and firs, which cupped little hollows and corners where the sunshine got in and never got out again, but stayed there and grew mellow, coaxing dear things to bloom long before they would dream of waking up elsewhere.