cobalamin

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co·bal·a·min

 (kō-băl′ə-mĭn) also co·bal·a·mine (-mēn′)

cobalamin

(kəʊˈbæləmɪn)
n
(Biochemistry) vitamin B12

vitamin B1


n.
[1920–25]

vitamin B2


n.
[1925–30]

vitamin B3


n.
[1975–80]

vitamin B6


n.
[1930–35]

vitamin B12


n.
a complex water-soluble solid, C63H88N14O14PCo, obtained from liver, milk, eggs, fish, oysters, and clams: a deficiency causes pernicious anemia and disorders of the nervous system. Also called cyanocobalamin, cobalamin, extrinsic factor.
[1945–50]

co·bal·a·min

(kō-băl′ə-mĭn)
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cobalamin - a B vitamin that is used to treat pernicious anemiacobalamin - a B vitamin that is used to treat pernicious anemia
B complex, B vitamin, B-complex vitamin, vitamin B, vitamin B complex, B - originally thought to be a single vitamin but now separated into several B vitamins
References in periodicals archive ?
Plasma holotranscobalamin compared with plasma cobalamins for assessment of vitamin [B.
NO is known to react with heme proteins, porphyrins, and cobalamins to form nitrosyl-metal complexes (32-36).
Vitamin B12 is actually a family of compounds called cobalamins, each of which has its own potential biological activity, in terms of absorption and potency.
Scientifically, vitamin B12 is one in a family of compounds called cobalamins.
Nexo E: Characterization of the cobalamins attached to transcobalamin I and transcobalamin II in human plasma.
12] is usually used as a generic term representing various cobalt-containing tetrapyrrole rings with attached nucleotide side chains that are chemically classified as cobalamins or corrinoids.
Carmel was the first to report that total haptocorrin (HC) and cobalamins are related and that this relationship may be associated with the occurrence of heterozygosity for HC deficiency (1).
Concentrations of holoTC were higher in cord blood when the mothers had higher total cobalamins.
Cobalamin concentrations were calculated with a calibration curve derived from samples with known concentrations of holoTC or cobalamins.
1 Holo-TC, (d) Cobalamins, (e) pmol/L pmol/L Patients Sex Day 0 Increase Day 0 Increase 1 F 47 4 221 -8 2 M 72 -11 164 -20 3 M 5 1 92 9 4 F 7 1 95 2 5 F 15 0 135 5 6 F 29 2 122 22 7 F 30 -9 384 -18 8 M 18 2 184 -32 9 M 17 3 135 -17 10 M 16 3 167 -13 11 M 7 -1 96 14 12 M 13 -1 113 5 13 F 22 -1 187 -12 14 F 15 2 201 1 15 F 6 0 149 15 16 M 12 2 155 -3 17 M 6 5 122 -28 (a) A genetic diagnosis was available for 12 patients, as described in Tanner et al.
This allows a direct measurement of the cobalamins attached to TC (4-6) or an indirect calculation of holoTC from measurement of total plasma cobalamins and the plasma cobalamins not attached to TC (7-9).
Some authors have suggested that measurement of plasma cobalamins has limited value in diagnosing patients with suspected vitamin [B.