cobblers


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cobblers

(ˈkɒbləz)
pl n
1. rubbish; nonsense: a load of old cobblers.
2. (Anatomy) another word for testicles. See testicle
interj
an exclamation of strong disagreement
[C20: from rhyming slang cobblers' awls balls]
Usage: The use of cobblers meaning 'nonsense' is so mild that hardly anyone these days is likely to be offended by it. Most people are probably unaware of its rhyming-slang association with 'balls', and therefore take it at its face value as a more colourful synonym for 'nonsense'. The classic formulation 'a load of (old) cobblers' seems to be particularly popular in the tabloid press
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cobblers - nonsense; "I think that is a load of cobblers"
hokum, meaninglessness, nonsense, nonsensicality, bunk - a message that seems to convey no meaning
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
2.cobblers - a man's testicles (from Cockney rhyming slang: cobbler's awl rhymes with ball)
ballock, bollock, testicle, testis, orchis, egg, ball, nut - one of the two male reproductive glands that produce spermatozoa and secrete androgens; "she kicked him in the balls and got away"
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
Translations

cobblers

[ˈkɒbləz] NPL (Brit)
1. (Anat) → cojones mpl
2. (fig) → chorradas fpl

cobblers

pl (Brit inf: = rubbish) → Scheiße f (inf), → Mist m (inf); (what a load of old) cobblers!was fürn Haufen Mist! (inf)
References in classic literature ?
I would mend the tire, having attended ambulance classes, do it very quietly so that she wouldn't hear, like the fairy cobblers who used to mend people's boots while they slept, and then wait in ambush to watch the effect upon her when she awoke.
Those poor lean cobblers, who think they can help to regenerate mankind by setting out to preach in the morning twilight before they begin their day's work, may well have a poor opinion of me.
It was a street of dingy houses huddled together; many of the windows had been broken and were clumsily repaired with strips of French newspaper; the doors had not been painted for years; there were shabby little shops on the ground floor, laundries, cobblers, stationers.
So he put on the clothes, and, still raging and swearing vengeance against all the cobblers in Derbyshire, he set forth upon his way afoot; but his ills had not yet done with him, for he had not gone far ere he fell into the hands of the King's men, who marched him off, willy-nilly, to Tutbury Town and the Bishop of Hereford.
SOCRATES: Or if we wanted him to be a good cobbler, should we not send him to the cobblers?
The cobbler wrought upon a shoe; the blacksmith hammered his iron, the soldier waved his glittering blade; the lady raised a tiny breeze with her fan; the jolly toper swigged lustily at his bottle; a scholar opened his book with eager thirst for knowledge, and turned his head to and fro along the page; the milkmaid energetically drained her cow; and a miser counted gold into his strong-box,--all at the same turning of a crank.
Early that afternoon old Mazey had taken the slippers to the village cobbler to get them repaired on the spot, before his master called for them the next morning; he sat superintending the progress and completion of the work until evening came, when he and the cobbler betook themselves to the village inn to drink each other's healths at parting.
The cobbler had given place to the elaborate factory, in which seventy men cooperated to make one shoe.
She answered with great humility that she was called La Tolosa, and that she was the daughter of a cobbler of Toledo who lived in the stalls of Sanchobienaya, and that wherever she might be she would serve and esteem him as her lord.
The band had been increased from time to time by picked men such as Arthur-a-Bland and David of Doncaster--he who was the jolliest cobbler for miles around--until it now numbered a full sevenscore of men; seven companies each with its stout lieutenant serving under Robin Hood.
That is, I believe it, perhaps, but at the same time I feel and suspect that I am lying like a cobbler.
But in that bitter tirade upon Chantilly, which appeared in yesterday's'Musée,' the satirist, making some disgraceful allusions to the cobbler s change of name upon assuming the buskin, quoted a Latin line about which we have often conversed.