cocaine


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Related to cocaine: Coca plant

co·caine

 (kō-kān′, kō′kān′)
n.
A colorless or white crystalline alkaloid, C17H21NO4, extracted from coca leaves, sometimes used in medicine as a local anesthetic especially for the eyes, nose, or throat and widely used as an illicit drug for its euphoric and stimulating effects.

[French cocaïne, from coca, coca, from Spanish; see coca.]

cocaine

(kəˈkeɪn) or

cocain

n
(Recreational Drugs) an addictive narcotic drug derived from coca leaves or synthesized, used medicinally as a topical anaesthetic. Formula: C17H21NO4
[C19: from coca + -ine1]

co•caine

(koʊˈkeɪn, ˈkoʊ keɪn)

n.
a bitter, white, crystalline alkaloid, C17H21NO4, obtained from coca leaves, used as a local anesthetic and also widely used as an illicit drug for its stimulant and euphoriant properties.
[1870–75]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cocaine - a narcotic (alkaloid) extracted from coca leavescocaine - a narcotic (alkaloid) extracted from coca leaves; used as a surface anesthetic or taken for pleasure; can become powerfully addictive
basuco - low-grade cocaine mixed with coca paste and cannabis
coca - dried leaves of the coca plant (and related plants that also contain cocaine); chewed by Andean people for their stimulating effect
nose candy, coke, snow, blow, C - street names for cocaine
crack cocaine, tornado, crack - a purified and potent form of cocaine that is smoked rather than snorted; highly addictive
hard drug - a narcotic that is considered relatively strong and likely to cause addiction
Translations
كوكائينكوكايينكُوكاييـن
kokain
kokain
kokaiin
kokaiini
kokain
kokain
kókaín
コカイン
코카인
kokainas
kokaīns
cocaină
kokaín
kokainкокаин
kokain
โคเคน
côcain

cocaine

[kəˈkeɪn]
A. Ncocaína f
B. CPD cocaine addict Ncocainómano/a m/f
cocaine addiction Nadicción f a la cocaína

cocaine

[kəʊˈkeɪn]
ncocaïne f
modif
cocaine habit (= addiction) → dépendance f à la cocaïne
his £300 a day cocaine habit → sa dépendance à la cocaïne qui lui coûtait 300 livres par jour

cocaine

nKokain nt

cocaine

[kəˈkeɪn] ncocaina

cocaine

(kəˈkein) noun
an addictive drug formerly used to deaden pain.

cocaine

كُوكاييـن kokain kokain Kokain κοκαΐνη cocaína kokaiini cocaïne kokain cocaina コカイン 코카인 cocaïne kokain kokaina cocaína кокаин kokain โคเคน kokain côcain 可卡因

co·caine

n. cocaína, narcótico alcaloide adictivo complejo obtenido de las hojas de coca; slang nieve.

cocaine

n cocaína
References in classic literature ?
On the contrary," he answered, "it would prevent me from taking a second dose of cocaine.
It is unlike tobacco, or cocaine, or morphine, or all the rest of the long list of drugs.
Save for the occasional use of cocaine, he had no vices, and he only turned to the drug as a protest against the monotony of existence when cases were scanty and the papers uninteresting.
My own complete happiness, and the home-centred interests which rise up around the man who first finds himself master of his own establishment, were sufficient to absorb all my attention, while Holmes, who loathed every form of society with his whole Bohemian soul, remained in our lodgings in Baker Street, buried among his old books, and alternating from week to week between cocaine and ambition, the drowsiness of the drug, and the fierce energy of his own keen nature.
Detection of benzoylecgonine, the primary metabolite of cocaine, is a common method for monitoring cocaine use during contingency management interventions.
This suggests cocaine causes epigenetic changes- that is alterations to DNA that do not involve changing the sequence- in sperm in which reprogrammed information is transmitted down to the next generation of men.
Use of drugs such as cocaine and heroin may also cause cognitive problems.
When we turn on a laser light in the prelimbic region of the prefrontal cortex, the compulsive cocaine seeking is gone," Antonello Bonci, senior author and scientific director of the intramural research program at the National Institute of Drug Abuse, said in a statement.
Led by Dr Karen Ersche, the researchers scanned the brains of 120 people, half of whom had a dependence on cocaine.
The review follows concerns over a three-fold rise in the number of cocaine users over the last ten years and "a popular misconception, at least as far as powder cocaine is concerned at middle-class dinner parties, (that) it's a safe drug", Prof Iversen said.
ANTHENELLI: How is immunotherapy being applied to treating cocaine addiction and how does TA-CD work?
But whereas anti-bodies against infectious diseases destroy or deactivate the disease-causing agents, anti-cocaine antibodies attach themselves to cocaine molecules in the blood, preventing them from passing through the blood-brain barrier and thereby inhibiting the cocaine-induced euphoria.