cochlea


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coch·le·a

 (kŏk′lē-ə, kō′klē-ə)
n. pl. coch·le·ae (-lē-ē′, -lē-ī′) also coch·le·as
A spiral-shaped cavity of the inner ear that resembles a snail shell and contains nerve endings essential for hearing.

[Latin, snail shell, from Greek kokhliās, snail, from kokhlos, land snail.]

coch′le·ar adj.

cochlea

(ˈkɒklɪə)
n, pl -leae (-lɪˌiː)
(Anatomy) the spiral tube, shaped like a snail's shell, that forms part of the internal ear, converting sound vibrations into nerve impulses
[C16: from Latin: snail, spiral, from Greek kokhlias; probably related to Greek konkhē conch]
ˈcochlear adj

coch•le•a

(ˈkɒk li ə, ˈkoʊ kli ə)

n.
pl. coch•le•ae (ˈkɒk liˌi, -liˌaɪ, ˈkoʊ kliˌi, -kliˌaɪ)
coch•le•as.
the fluid-filled, spiral-shaped part of the inner ear in mammals.
[1530–40; < Latin < Greek kochlíās snail (with spiral shell), screw, probably akin to kónchē conch]
coch′le•ar, adj.

coch·le·a

(kŏk′lē-ə)
A spiral tube of the inner ear that looks like a snail shell and contains the nerve endings necessary for hearing.

cochlea

Part of the inner ear concerned with hearing: a canal coiled like a snail’s shell and linked to the acoustic nerve.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cochlea - the snail-shaped tube (in the inner ear coiled around the modiolus) where sound vibrations are converted into nerve impulses by the organ of Corticochlea - the snail-shaped tube (in the inner ear coiled around the modiolus) where sound vibrations are converted into nerve impulses by the organ of Corti
tube-shaped structure, tube - (anatomy) any hollow cylindrical body structure
basilar membrane - a membrane in the cochlea that supports the organ of Corti
inner ear, internal ear, labyrinth - a complex system of interconnecting cavities; concerned with hearing and equilibrium
modiolus - the central conical bony pillar of the cochlea
organ of Corti - the hearing organ of the inner ear; contains receptors that respond to sound waves
Translations
hlemýžď
simpukka

cochlea

[ˈkɒklɪə] N (cochleae (pl)) [ˈkɒklɪiː]cóclea f, caracol m óseo

cochlea

[ˈkɒkliə] nlimaçon m, cochlée f

cochlea

[ˈkɒklɪə] n (cochleae (pl)) [ˈkɒklɪˌiː] (Anat) → coclea

coch·lea

n. cóclea, parte del oído interno en forma de caracol.

cochlea

n (pl -leae) cóclea
References in periodicals archive ?
HEI's technology involves the use of small-interfering nucleic acids and small molecules to regenerate lost hair cells in the cochlea.
The central auditory pathway consists of a complex network of neurons and nuclei that connect the cochlea to the auditory cortex.
If these reflexes have no time to respond, the vibrations will damage the delicate hair cells in the cochlea (the inner ear) and can rupture the eardrum.
Unlike a hearing aid, the individual needs an operation to place the implant in the cochlea (or inner ear) inside their head.
In addition, a partial loss of constructive interference in a steady state (CISS) signal was noted in the basal turn and the middle turn (figure 2, A) of the cochlea.
The impulses are transmitted to the cochlea through a small bundle of implanted electrodes, creating a sense of sound that the user learns to associate with the mid- and high-frequency sounds they remember.
This implant included a long, flexible electrode, which could, for the first time, deliver electric signals to the auditory nerve along a large part of the cochlea, the snail-shaped inner ear.
SLC26A4 is normally found in the cochlea and vestibular organs of the inner ear as well as in the endolymphatic sac, which is a non-sensory part of the inner ear.
When it picks up a noise or sound, it uses an electrical impulse to stimulate the cochlea to hear it.
Then they removed the rodents' inner ears, which include the spiraled, snail-shaped cochlea and other organs.
The latest offering in AB's HiFocus[TM] electrode family, the HiFocus Mid-Scala is designed to help protect the delicate structures of the cochlea for the preservation of residual hearing without compromising performance.
The topics include the physics and analysis of sound, the auditory nerve, mechanism of transduction and excitation in the cochlea, the auditory cortex, and sensorineural hearing loss.