cochlea

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coch·le·a

 (kŏk′lē-ə, kō′klē-ə)
n. pl. coch·le·ae (-lē-ē′, -lē-ī′) also coch·le·as
A spiral-shaped cavity of the inner ear that resembles a snail shell and contains nerve endings essential for hearing.

[Latin, snail shell, from Greek kokhliās, snail, from kokhlos, land snail.]

coch′le·ar adj.

cochlea

(ˈkɒklɪə)
n, pl -leae (-lɪˌiː)
(Anatomy) the spiral tube, shaped like a snail's shell, that forms part of the internal ear, converting sound vibrations into nerve impulses
[C16: from Latin: snail, spiral, from Greek kokhlias; probably related to Greek konkhē conch]
ˈcochlear adj

coch•le•a

(ˈkɒk li ə, ˈkoʊ kli ə)

n.
pl. coch•le•ae (ˈkɒk liˌi, -liˌaɪ, ˈkoʊ kliˌi, -kliˌaɪ)
coch•le•as.
the fluid-filled, spiral-shaped part of the inner ear in mammals.
[1530–40; < Latin < Greek kochlíās snail (with spiral shell), screw, probably akin to kónchē conch]
coch′le•ar, adj.

coch·le·a

(kŏk′lē-ə)
A spiral tube of the inner ear that looks like a snail shell and contains the nerve endings necessary for hearing.

cochlea

Part of the inner ear concerned with hearing: a canal coiled like a snail’s shell and linked to the acoustic nerve.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cochlea - the snail-shaped tube (in the inner ear coiled around the modiolus) where sound vibrations are converted into nerve impulses by the organ of Corticochlea - the snail-shaped tube (in the inner ear coiled around the modiolus) where sound vibrations are converted into nerve impulses by the organ of Corti
tube-shaped structure, tube - (anatomy) any hollow cylindrical body structure
basilar membrane - a membrane in the cochlea that supports the organ of Corti
inner ear, internal ear, labyrinth - a complex system of interconnecting cavities; concerned with hearing and equilibrium
modiolus - the central conical bony pillar of the cochlea
organ of Corti - the hearing organ of the inner ear; contains receptors that respond to sound waves
Translations
hlemýžď
simpukka

cochlea

[ˈkɒklɪə] N (cochleae (pl)) [ˈkɒklɪiː]cóclea f, caracol m óseo

cochlea

[ˈkɒkliə] nlimaçon m, cochlée f

cochlea

[ˈkɒklɪə] n (cochleae (pl)) [ˈkɒklɪˌiː] (Anat) → coclea

coch·lea

n. cóclea, parte del oído interno en forma de caracol.

cochlea

n (pl -leae) cóclea
References in periodicals archive ?
CT of the temporal bone revealed partial ossification in the basal turns of both cochleas (figure 3).
After noise exposure, the guinea pigs underwent auditory brainstem response (ABR) threshold measurements, reactive oxygen species (ROS) were detected in their cochleas with electron spin resonance (ESR), and outer hair cells (OHCs) were counted with silvernitrate (AgNO [sub]3 ) staining at 1, 4, and 6 days.
When transplanted into the cochleas of deaf adult gerbils, the human cells partially restored the animals' hearing, the researchers report online September 12 in Nature.
A CT scan prior surgery showed patency of both cochleas.
Most of them design their artificial cochleas just like thin membrane with different width along its length.
Scientists thought coiled cochleas evolved as a way to pack a longer tube length into the available skull space, giving mammals better low-frequency hearing than other vertebrates, which lack cochleas.
A difference, however, was seen between the implanted ungrafted and the implanted grafted cochleas but not between the use of fascia and Gelfoam.
Scientists managed to grow the hair cells vital to hearing in the cochleas of genetically modified mice.
But it is not, I would say, about sound, although it becomes easy to imagine some rather crude blowing sound being produced above, and the glassy tinkling of the little cochleas as they cascade into one another below.
Researchers at Genentech in South San Francisco now report that they've grown new hair cells in tissue taken from newborn rats' cochleas.
Over the next 10 days, the damaged area gradually returned to normal, and the thymidine tracer turned up in the damaged area in the nuclei of both hair cells and supporting cells but not in undamaged regions of the chicks' cochleas -- the affected inner-ear structure -- or in chicks that received the tracer but were not subjected to loud noise.