cockade


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

cock·ade

 (kŏ-kād′)
n.
An ornament, such as a rosette or knot of ribbon, usually worn on the hat as a badge.

[Alteration of obsolete cockard, from French cocarde, from Old French coquarde, feminine of coquard, vain, cocky, from coc, cock, from Late Latin coccus; see cock1.]

cock·ad′ed adj.

cockade

(kɒˈkeɪd)
n
(Military) a feather or ribbon worn on military headwear
[C18: changed from earlier cockard, from French cocarde, feminine of cocard arrogant, strutting, from coq cock1]
cockˈaded adj

cock•ade

(kɒˈkeɪd)

n.
a rosette or the like, worn on the hat as part of a uniform, as a badge of office, etc.
[1650–60; alter. of cocarde < French, =coc cock2 + -arde -ard]
cock•ad′ed, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cockade - an ornament (such as a knot of ribbon or a rosette) usually worn on the hat
decoration, ornament, ornamentation - something used to beautify
Translations
شَريط أو شارَه في قُبَّعَه
kokarda
kokarde
kokárda
borîahnútur
kokarda
kokarde
kokarda
şapkaya takılan rozet

cockade

[kɒˈkeɪd] Nescarapela f

cockade

nKokarde f

cockade

[kɒˈkeɪd] ncoccarda

cockade

(kəˈkeid) noun
formerly, a knot of ribbon worn as a hat-badge.
References in classic literature ?
John, with the tall candlesticks in his hands, bowed them up to the fireplace; Hugh, striding in with a lighted brand and pile of firewood, cast it down upon the hearth, and set it in a blaze; John Grueby (who had a great blue cockade in his hat, which he appeared to despise mightily) brought in the portmanteau he had carried on his horse, and placed it on the floor; and presently all three were busily engaged in drawing out the screen, laying the cloth, inspecting the beds, lighting fires in the bedrooms, expediting the supper, and making everything as cosy and as snug as might be, on so short a notice.
Not at all discomposed by the discovery, John Grueby fixed his hat on, wrongside foremost that he might be unconscious of the shadow of the obnoxious cockade, and withdrew to bed; shaking his head in a very gloomy and prophetic manner until he reached his chamber.
They say he shot the cockade off his own servant's hat; just like him to have cockades, of course.
He'd shot a cockade off a hat and a weathercock off a building.
The red cap and tri-colour cockade were universal, both among men and women.
The escort were two mounted patriots in red caps and tri-coloured cockades, armed with national muskets and sabres, who rode one on either side of him.
button, a black hat with a cockade to it, a pink striped waistcoat, light breeches and gaiters, and a variety of other necessaries, too numerous to recapitulate.
I took him as he was sleeping on the sofa, and it is as strong a likeness of his cockade as you would wish to see.
Miss Anne rose assentingly, and the good brother took her away, while Joshua's preliminary scrapings burst into the "White Cockade," from which he intended to pass to a variety of tunes, by a series of transitions which his good ear really taught him to execute with some skill.
Through the park railings these glances beheld men and women riding in the Row, couples cantering past harmoniously, others advancing sedately at a walk, loitering groups of three or four, solitary horsemen looking unsociable, and solitary women followed at a long distance by a groom with a cockade to his hat and a leather belt over his tight-fitting coat.
as Miss Snevellicci said) with perpetual sniffs of SAL VOLATILE and sips of brandy and other gentle stimulants, until they reached the manager's door, which was already opened by the two Master Crummleses, who wore white cockades, and were decorated with the choicest and most resplendent waistcoats in the theatrical wardrobe.
Frederick Bullock (whose chariot might daily be seen in the Ring, with bullocks or emblazoned on the panels and harness, and three pasty-faced little Bullocks, covered with cockades and feathers, staring from the windows) Mrs.