cocked


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Related to cocked: come in handy, couldn't, halfcocked

cock 1

 (kŏk)
n.
1.
a. An adult male chicken; a rooster.
b. An adult male of various other birds.
2. A weathervane shaped like a rooster; a weathercock.
3. A faucet or valve by which the flow of a liquid or gas can be regulated.
4.
a. The hammer of a firearm.
b. The position of the hammer of a firearm when ready for firing.
5. A tilting or jaunty turn upward: the cock of a hat.
6. Vulgar Slang
a. The penis.
b. A man or boy regarded as mean or contemptible.
7. Archaic The characteristic cry of a rooster early in the morning.
tr.v. cocked, cock·ing, cocks
1. To set the hammer of (a firearm) in a position ready for firing.
2. To set (a device, such as a camera shutter) in a position ready for use.
3. To tilt or turn up or to one side, usually in a jaunty or alert manner: cocked an eyebrow in response to a silly question.
4. To raise in preparation to throw or hit: cocked the bat before swinging at the pitch.
Idiom:
cock of the walk
An overbearing or domineering person.

[Middle English cok, from Old English cocc, probably from Late Latin coccus, from coco, a cackling, of imitative origin.]

cock 2

 (kŏk)
n.
A cone-shaped pile of straw or hay.
tr.v. cocked, cock·ing, cocks
To arrange (straw or hay) into piles shaped like cones.

[Middle English cok.]
Translations

cocked

[kɒkt] ADJ cocked hatsombrero m de tres picos
to knock sth into a cocked hatser muy superior a algo

cocked

adj cocked hat (with two points) → Zweispitz m; (with three points) → Dreispitz m; to knock somebody into a cocked hat (inf) (= beat up)aus jdm Kleinholz machen; (= outdo)jdn total an die Wand spielen; this painting knocks all the others into a cocked hat (inf)dieses Gemälde stellt alle anderen in den Schatten
References in classic literature ?
Plates for a corresponding number of guests were warming behind the fender; and the guests themselves were warming before it: the chief and most important of whom appeared to be a stoutish gentleman in a bright crimson coat with long tails, vividly red breeches, and a cocked hat, who was standing with his back to the fire, and had apparently just entered, for besides retaining his cocked hat on his head, he carried in his hand a high stick, such as gentlemen of his profession usually elevate in a sloping position over the roofs of carriages.
Smauker, my lad, your fin,' said the gentleman with the cocked hat.
Smauker dovetailed the top joint of his right-hand little finger into that of the gentleman with the cocked hat, and said he was charmed to see him looking so well.
Well, they tell me I am looking pretty blooming,' said the man with the cocked hat, 'and it's a wonder, too.
The man with the cocked hat breathed short, and looked long at Sam, but apparently thought it as well to say nothing, in case he should get the worst of it.
He laid aside the cocked hat and stick which he had just taken up, and said he would have one glass, for good fellowship's sake.
Same with cocked hats; the cocks form gable-end eave-troughs, Flask.
Morgan, who had stopped and was intently watching the agitated chaparral, said nothing, but had cocked both barrels of his gun and was holding it in readiness to aim.
He cocked his head to one side, shut one eye and put the other one to the hole, like a possum looking down a jug; then he glanced up with his bright eyes, gave a wink or two with his wings--which signifies gratification, you understand--and says, 'It looks like a hole, it's located like a hole--blamed if I don't believe it IS a hole
Then he cocked his head down and took another look; he glances up perfectly joyful, this time; winks his wings and his tail both, and says, 'Oh, no, this ain't no fat thing, I reckon