cockle


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cock·le 1

 (kŏk′əl)
n.
1. Any of various chiefly marine bivalve mollusks of the family Cardiidae, having rounded or heart-shaped shells with radiating ribs.
2. The shell of a cockle.
3. A wrinkle; a pucker.
4. Nautical A cockleshell.
intr. & tr.v. cock·led, cock·ling, cock·les
To become or cause to become wrinkled or puckered.
Idiom:
cockles of (one's) heart
One's innermost feelings: The valentine warmed the cockles of my heart.

[Middle English cokel, from Old French coquille, shell, from Vulgar Latin *cochillia, from Latin conchyllium, from Greek konkhulion, diminutive of konkhē, mussel.]

cock·le 2

 (kŏk′əl)
n.
Any of several weedy plants, especially the corn cockle.

[Middle English cokkel, from Old English coccel, from Medieval Latin *cocculus, diminutive of Latin coccus, kermes berry, from Greek kokkos.]

cockle

(ˈkɒkəl)
n
1. (Animals) any sand-burrowing bivalve mollusc of the family Cardiidae, esp Cardium edule (edible cockle) of Europe, typically having a rounded shell with radiating ribs
2. (Animals) any of certain similar or related molluscs
3. (Zoology) short for cockleshell1
4. a wrinkle or puckering, as in cloth or paper
5. (Mechanical Engineering) a small furnace or stove
6. cockles of one's heart one's deepest feelings (esp in the phrase warm the cockles of one's heart)
vb
to contract or cause to contract into wrinkles
[C14: from Old French coquille shell, from Latin conchӯlium shellfish, from Greek konkhulion, diminutive of konkhule mussel; see conch]

cockle

(ˈkɒkəl)
n
(Plants) any of several plants, esp the corn cockle, that grow as weeds in cornfields

cock•le1

(ˈkɒk əl)

n., v. -led, -ling. n.
1. any bivalve mollusk of the family Cardiidae having heart-shaped, usu. radially ribbed valves.
3. a wrinkle or pucker, esp. in fabric.
v.t., v.i.
4. to wrinkle or pucker.
Idioms:
cockles of one's heart, the place of one's deepest feelings.
[1350–1400; Middle English cokille < Middle French coqille < Latin conchȳlium < Greek konchylion <konchyl(ē) mussel]

cock•le2

(ˈkɒk əl)

n.
any of various weeds of grain fields, as the darnel.
[before 1000; Middle English; Old English coccel]

cock·le

(kŏk′əl)
Any of various bivalve mollusks having rounded or heart-shaped shells with radiating ridges.

cockle


Past participle: cockled
Gerund: cockling

Imperative
cockle
cockle
Present
I cockle
you cockle
he/she/it cockles
we cockle
you cockle
they cockle
Preterite
I cockled
you cockled
he/she/it cockled
we cockled
you cockled
they cockled
Present Continuous
I am cockling
you are cockling
he/she/it is cockling
we are cockling
you are cockling
they are cockling
Present Perfect
I have cockled
you have cockled
he/she/it has cockled
we have cockled
you have cockled
they have cockled
Past Continuous
I was cockling
you were cockling
he/she/it was cockling
we were cockling
you were cockling
they were cockling
Past Perfect
I had cockled
you had cockled
he/she/it had cockled
we had cockled
you had cockled
they had cockled
Future
I will cockle
you will cockle
he/she/it will cockle
we will cockle
you will cockle
they will cockle
Future Perfect
I will have cockled
you will have cockled
he/she/it will have cockled
we will have cockled
you will have cockled
they will have cockled
Future Continuous
I will be cockling
you will be cockling
he/she/it will be cockling
we will be cockling
you will be cockling
they will be cockling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been cockling
you have been cockling
he/she/it has been cockling
we have been cockling
you have been cockling
they have been cockling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been cockling
you will have been cockling
he/she/it will have been cockling
we will have been cockling
you will have been cockling
they will have been cockling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been cockling
you had been cockling
he/she/it had been cockling
we had been cockling
you had been cockling
they had been cockling
Conditional
I would cockle
you would cockle
he/she/it would cockle
we would cockle
you would cockle
they would cockle
Past Conditional
I would have cockled
you would have cockled
he/she/it would have cockled
we would have cockled
you would have cockled
they would have cockled
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cockle - common edible European bivalvecockle - common edible European bivalve  
Cardium edule, edible cockle - common edible European cockle
shellfish - meat of edible aquatic invertebrate with a shell (especially a mollusk or crustacean)
2.cockle - common edible, burrowing European bivalve mollusk that has a strong, rounded shell with radiating ribs
bivalve, lamellibranch, pelecypod - marine or freshwater mollusks having a soft body with platelike gills enclosed within two shells hinged together
Cardium, genus Cardium - type genus of the family Cardiidae: cockles
Cardium edule, edible cockle - common edible European cockle
Verb1.cockle - stir up (water) so as to form ripplescockle - stir up (water) so as to form ripples
flow, flux - move or progress freely as if in a stream; "The crowd flowed out of the stadium"
2.cockle - to gather something into small wrinkles or folds; "She puckered her lips"
draw - contract; "The material drew after it was washed in hot water"
crease, crinkle, crisp, ruckle, scrunch up, wrinkle, scrunch - make wrinkles or creases on a smooth surface; make a pressed, folded or wrinkled line in; "The dress got wrinkled"; "crease the paper like this to make a crane"
Translations

cockle

[ˈkɒkl] N (Zool) → berberecho m
to warm the cockles of sb's heartllenar a algn de ternura

cockle

[ˈkɒkəl] n (= shellfish) → coque f

cockle

n
(= shellfish: also cockleshell) → Herzmuschel f
(= boat)kleines Boot, Nussschale f
it warmed the cockles of my heartes wurde mir warm ums Herz

cockle

[ˈkɒkl] n (shellfish) → cardio
it warmed the cockles of my heart → mi riempì il cuore di gioia
References in classic literature ?
With silver bells, and cockle shells, And marigolds all in a row.
It was laughable, while we glanced along, as it were, at the tail of a thunderbolt, to observe two dusty foot travellers in the old pilgrim guise, with cockle shell and staff, their mystic rolls of parchment in their hands and their intolerable burdens on their backs.
And we chuckled to think how wet they were going to get, and came back and stirred the fire, and got our books, and arranged our specimens of seaweed and cockle shells.
Well," said Good, "to adopt the language of hyperbole, in which all these people seem to indulge, you can tell him that a row is surely good, and warms the cockles of the heart, and that so far as I am concerned I'm his boy.
and it warmed the cockles of her heart that the members appreciated her efforts so sincerely.
I played at hot cockles, last night, at my Lord of Leicester's.
Lord Surrey and Lord Leicester sound fine, but hot cockles, and red mittens, and shoes for three shillings, are horrid.
It warmed the cockles of my geniality and put a fairer face on the truly fair face of the sea.
The purl warms the cockles of Tom's heart, and makes him cough.
A cockling ban slapped on the Dee Estuary in Flintshire following a "sharp drop" in cockle stocks will be lifted for an eight-week period.
A spokesman for 50 cockle-pickers who lost their jobs spoke out after Natural Resources Wales (NRW) banned the harvesting of cockles to protect threatened oystercatchers that feed on them.
1 APRIL means cockle season in seaside towns around the country.