cockney


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cock·ney

or Cock·ney (kŏk′nē)
n. pl. cock·neys or Cock·neys
1. A native of the East End of London.
2. The dialect or accent of the natives of the East End of London.
adj.
Relating to cockneys or their dialect.

[Middle English cokenei, cock's egg, pampered child, city dweller : coken, cock (possibly blend of cok; see cock1, and chiken, chicken; see chicken) + ei, egg (from Old English ǣg; see awi- in Indo-European roots).]

cockney

(ˈkɒknɪ)
n
1. (Peoples) (often capital) a native of London, esp of the working class born in the East End, speaking a characteristic dialect of English. Traditionally defined as someone born within the sound of the bells of St Mary-le-Bow church
2. (Linguistics) the urban dialect of London or its East End
3. (Animals) Austral a young snapper fish
adj
4. (Peoples) characteristic of cockneys or their dialect of English
5. (Languages) characteristic of cockneys or their dialect of English
[C14: from cokeney, literally: cock's egg, later applied contemptuously to townsmen, from cokene, genitive plural of cok cock1 + ey egg1]
ˈcockneyish adj

cock•ney

(ˈkɒk ni)

n., pl. -neys.
1. (sometimes cap.) a member of the native-born working-class population of London, England, esp. an inhabitant of the East End district.
2. (sometimes cap.) the speech of this population, typifying the broadest form of local London dialect.
3. Obs.
a. a pampered child.
b. a squeamish, affected person.
[1325–75; Middle English cokeney foolish person, literally, cock's egg (i.e., malformed egg) =coken, genitive pl. of cok cock1 + ey, Old English æg egg1]
cock′ney•ish, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Cockney - a native of the east end of London
Londoner - a native or resident of London
2.cockney - the nonstandard dialect of natives of the east end of London
English, English language - an Indo-European language belonging to the West Germanic branch; the official language of Britain and the United States and most of the commonwealth countries
Adj.1.cockney - characteristic of Cockneys or their dialect; "cockney vowels"
2.Cockney - relating to or resembling a cockney; "Cockney street urchins"
Translations
أحَدُ سُكّان لَنْدَن الأصْلِيينلُغَةُ سُكّان لَنْدَن
londýnské nářečílondýnskýrodilý Londýňan
cockney
kokknei-, Lundúna-kokknei, Lundúnabúi
kokni
koknejietiskoknejs
londýnsky dialektrodený Londýnčan
Doğu LondralıDoğu Londralı şivesiKokney

cockney

[ˈkɒknɪ]
A. N
1. (= person) persona nacida en el este de Londres y especialmente de clase obrera
2. (= dialect) → dialecto m de esa zona
B. ADJ del este de Londres y especialmente de clase obrera RHYMING SLANG
COCKNEY
Se llama cockneys a las personas de la zona este de Londres conocida como East End, un barrio tradicionalmente obrero, aunque según la tradición un cockney auténtico ha de haber nacido dentro del área en la que se oye el repique de las campanas de la iglesia de Mary-Le-Bow, en la City londinense. Este término también hace referencia al dialecto que se habla en esta parte de Londres, aunque a veces también se aplica a cualquier acento de la clase trabajadora londinense. El actor Michael Caine es un cockney famoso.

cockney

[ˈkɒkni]
n
(= person) → cockney mf habitant des quartiers populaires de l'East End de Londres
I'm a cockney → Je suis cockney.
(= dialect) → cockney m
adj [person] → cockney; [accent, joke] → cockney

cockney

n
(= dialect)Cockney nt
(= person)Cockney m
adjCockney-

cockney

[ˈkɒknɪ] n (person) → cockney m/f inv abitante dei quartieri dell'East End di Londra; (dialect) → cockney m

cockney

(ˈkokni) noun
1. a native of the City of London.
2. his speech. He spoke cockney; (also adjective) a cockney accent.
References in classic literature ?
A sprightly tramp promised greater difficulty, and nothing but some ferocious pantomime and a shilling persuaded him to forego a choice fantasia of cockney humour.
83, he declared that, as he had seen all the civilized parts of the earth, he was inclined to make a trip to the wilds of America We will not trace him in his brief wanderings, under the influence of that spirit of emigration that some times induces a dapper Cockney to quit his home, and lands him, before the sound of Bow-bells is out of his ears, within the roar of the cataract of Niagara; but shall only add that at a very early day, even before Elizabeth had been sent to school, he had found his way into the family of Marmaduke Temple, where, owing to a combination of qualities that will be developed in the course of the tale, he held, under Mr.
The king began to laugh again, like the happiest cockney of his kingdom.
The author who, after the fashion of "The North American Review," should be upon all occasions merely "quiet," must necessarily upon many occasions be simply silly, or stupid; and has no more right to be considered "easy" or "natural" than a Cockney exquisite, or than the sleeping Beauty in the waxworks.
Yes, I'm a cockney, all right," replied Wilson, "and I think I'm all the better for that.
But as the Cockney apparition drew nearer, Muscari was astounded to observe that the head was distinctly different from the body.
It made a curious little scene, this attempt of the Cockney to convey the grace and geniality of the South.
What kind of a Cockney bounder and cad could she have taken him for?
Some of them have come in useful even to your knowledge, Bunny: what price my Cockney that night in St.
I would decipher a sound which a cockney would represent by zerr, and a Frenchman by seu, and then write demanding with some heat what on earth it meant.
He was as his State had made him, and the reader must not imagine because he was a little Cockney cad, that he was absolutely incapable of grasping the idea of the Butteridge flying-machine.
He was a thin, sandy-haired man of about thirty-five, spoke with a Cockney accent, and had about him a frugal look, as if nature had not dealt generously with him in any way, which, naturally, prevented him from dealing generously with other people.