cocoyam


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co·co·yam

(kō′kō-yăm′)
n.
1. See taro.
2. See malanga.

[coco(a) + yam (from its being planted in coconut groves).]

cocoyam

(ˈkəʊkəʊˌjæm)
n
1. (Plants) either of two food plants of West Africa, the taro or the yantia, both of which have edible underground stems
2. (Cookery) the underground stem of either of these plants
[C20: from cocoa + yam]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cocoyam - edible starchy tuberous root of taro plantscocoyam - edible starchy tuberous root of taro plants
Colocasia esculenta, dalo, taro plant, dasheen, taro - herb of the Pacific islands grown throughout the tropics for its edible root and in temperate areas as an ornamental for its large glossy leaves
root - (botany) the usually underground organ that lacks buds or leaves or nodes; absorbs water and mineral salts; usually it anchors the plant to the ground
2.cocoyam - tropical starchy tuberous rootcocoyam - tropical starchy tuberous root  
root vegetable - any of various fleshy edible underground roots or tubers
poi - Hawaiian dish of taro root pounded to a paste and often allowed to ferment
Colocasia esculenta, dalo, taro plant, dasheen, taro - herb of the Pacific islands grown throughout the tropics for its edible root and in temperate areas as an ornamental for its large glossy leaves
References in periodicals archive ?
Successful private companies use the tool routinely to produce bananas, pineapples, mangoes and root crops such as potato, cassava, yam, and cocoyam.
Cocoyam (Colocasia esculenta) leaf was purchased from market centres in Kumasi and Sunyani (both cities are in the forest belt of Ghana, where cocoyam grows well).
The primary farming activity of the two study communities was crop farming of predominantly food crops such as cassava, yam, maize, plantain, cocoyam, tomato, garden eggs (local eggplant) and pepper.
Households produced an average of seven crops, the most common of which were maize, cassava, cocoyam and yam, followed by plantain, chili pepper and okra.
Cocoyam (Xanthosoma sagittifolium) is herbaceous perennial plant belonging to the araceae family and constitutes one of the six most important root and tuber crops world-wide [1].
Quaye W, Adofo K, Agyeman KO and F Nimoh Socioeconomic survey of traditional commercial Production of Cocoyam and Cocoyam leaf.
However no literature has been found on the production of cookies from cocoyam and pigeon pea flour.
Rodriguez L, Peniche I and TR Preston Digestibility and nitrogen balance in growing pigs fed a diet of sugarcane juice and fresh leaves of new cocoyam (Xanthosomasagitt ifolium) as partial or complete replacement for soybean protein.
These include indigenous vegetables (IVs) such as huckleberry (Solanum scabrum), pumpkin leaves (Cucurbita moschata), cocoyam leaves (Xanthosoma sagittifolium), garden eggs (Solanum melongena) and exotic vegetables such as okra (Abelmoscus esculentus), tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum), carrots (Daucus carota) and sweet peper (Capsicum annuum).
Cocoa farmers also cultivated food crops (plantain, cassava, maize, cocoyam, yam, rice, banana, pineapple, okro and ginger) and other tree crops (coffee, oil palm, citrus and coconut) with respective average farm sizes of about 1 ha and 2 ha.
Ilishan farmers are noted for their food crops such as various types of yam especially the one called alo pepper of different kinds, cassava, cocoyam, maize, oranges and groundnut, cocoa, cashew and kola nuts.
Arsenic, cadmium, and mercury in cocoyam (Xanthosoma sagititolium) and watercocoyam (Colocasia esculenta) in Tarkwa a mining community.