coction

coction

(ˈkɒkʃən)
n
the act of boiling
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Tenders are invited for Construction of cart bridge for halla crossing to the Road leading from Hanyalu - R pura Road to Hanyalu- katyal Road coming under the atct of Dy 18 under HRBC, Coction of cart bridge across w/w of Hanyalu tank coming under the atchcut of Dy 18 under HRBC, E w cavation and Construction of CD works and Providing C.
The coction, that is, the boiling and confection, of the holy chrism was a prolonged and involved activity, mixing various fragrances into the olive oil.
38) George Wagner gave the fifteenth century as the earliest textual witness to the coction of the myron on Holy Thursday at Constantinople.
A pious Alexandrian legend regarding the coction of the Holy Myron takes it back to the Apostles, then next to Athanasius (328-73) in Alexandria, followed by the pontificate of Theophilus (384-412).
But, after 300 years only Alexandria had preserved enough to mix the myron with a new coction and then distribute it to the other Apostolic Sees.
Lois' boss Perry White (Fishburne) shuts down her story as a conA[degrees] coction of her hallucinations, but that does not fetter her as she tracks down Clark to the Kent farm.
After an initial round of coction in the stomach, Galenic medicine asserted that there was a secondary process of coction in the liver that formed all the humors sequentially: Blood first, then Phlegma, Bile and finally Black Bile.
As the final product of the secondary coction of food in the liver, Black Bile is the least nutritive and the most toxic.
COCTION A The act of boiling B The covering of a larva C A mixture of poisonous substances who am I?
cooks up a chili con coction Sunday at the Knights of Columbus Council's ninth annual cook-off and car show.
Partial solutions have been found however the coction time reduction (to approximately 3 hours) for the continuous production is yet to be demonstrated.