codetermination


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Related to codetermination: Mitbestimmung

co·de·ter·mi·na·tion

 (kō′dĭ-tûr′mə-nā′shən)
n.
Cooperation, especially between labor and management, in policymaking.

codetermination

(ˌkəʊdɪtɜːmɪˈneɪʃən)
n
(Industrial Relations & HR Terms) joint participation of management and employees or employees' trade union representatives in some decisions

co•de•ter•mi•na•tion

(ˌkoʊ dɪˌtɜr məˈneɪ ʃən)

n.
the determination of policy through cooperation, as between management and labor.
[1945–1950]
References in periodicals archive ?
The mutual dependence of trust and political activity/rent seeking has similarities to other articles that model the codetermination of attitudes and economic outcomes.
The CEO of the German company Siemens argues that codetermination is a "comparative advantage" for Germany; the senior managing director of the U.
The articles of association can provide for a higher number but the number must be divisible by three, unless the codetermination laws provide otherwise.
2004: Capital, labor, and the firm: A study of German codetermination.
ESOPs, law firms, codetermination, and economic democracy.
German telecommunications companies diverged from their American counterparts by "investing in skills and expanding worker discretion" rather than "rationalizing and deskilling their fronfline service and sales jobs," (210) However the divergence in the quality of call sector jobs in the two countries was short lived because, during the decade of the 2000s, telecommunications firms in Germany found ways to avoid the codetermination political structures that had previously forced them to engage in meaningful negotiations with worker representatives.
Rather, Germany's mandatory codetermination laws provide that a portion of the supervisory board members have to be elected by the employees.
The predominance of this characteristic was based upon and relies on the existence and support of a number of structural elements, including but not limited to: the comprehensive legal regime of codetermination, restrictions on the distribution of dividends, and corporate stock repurchases.
In other words, granting employees legal participation or codetermination voting rights--since they are contributors to wealth creation and their careers are also at risk when strategies are enacted-would allow them to have a voice at the board level regarding strategy choices (Adams, 1992).